My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WARM SPRINGS, Ga., Monday—Well, here I am at Warm Springs, surrounded by trees and absolute peace and quiet. It is really quite a contrast to the last few days and, now that I have time to think, I must go back and tell you a little about those days.

The drive from Spokane, Washington, to Moscow, the home of the University of Idaho, was most interesting. The Palouse country was a revelation to me, for I had no idea this part of the country was such a great producer of wheat, nor did I know of their custom of using a field one year and letting it lie fallow the next. These tremendous rolling fields are now showing signs of soil erosion and it is a comfort to know the Government is working with the farmers on this problem, which should be tackled before it gets any worse.

The University has a lovely campus with a view of the mountains. I planted a little native tree there which I hope will do as well as the one planted by my uncle, President Theodore Roosevelt. His tree has grown strong and straight and is worthy of his memory.

After my speech, I had an opportunity to meet some of the faculty and the heads of the various women's organizations. Then we motored back to Spokane through a much more wooded part of the country, lying chiefly in the State of Idaho. President and Mrs. Harrison Dale, my hosts, were more than kind and I was happy to have this opportunity of meeting them.

We were a little late for the plane, but I caught it. In Salt Lake City I found that the sleeper plane out of San Francisco, which I was to take, was even later. As usual, Salt Lake City was most hospitable and the Democratic State Committee Chairwoman and several other ladies were there to greet me and see me off on the next lap of my journey.

At last I have travelled on a sleeper plane. I slept well and, in the morning, the stewardess managed to serve breakfast very efficiently in spite of restricted quarters. We ate four at a time until everyone had been fed. Breakfast was served because our plane, instead of arriving in Chicago at 8:30, arrived at eleven-twenty. Mr. Errol Flynn, the movie star, was a passenger and I had a few minutes chat with him as well as with several other people, one of whom was deeply interested in work for crippled children.

In Chicago, our old friend, Mr. Louis Ruppel, and his two small boys waited to greet me. Unfortunately, there was little time for conversation, for I had to get my bags rechecked, file my column and make my plane for Atlanta, Georgia. Good weather stayed with us until just before we reached Atlanta, where it began to rain. We were on time, however, and I was perfectly delighted to see Mrs. Scheider and my brother at the airport.

Mr. and Mrs. Wright, of Atlanta, drove us all out to Warm Springs. My brother was able to stay for supper with us before taking a midnight plane for the North.

I feel very far away from my Seattle family, but it is nice to think that in such a short time one can cover so many miles and that my husband was glad to have the latest news.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL