My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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SEATTLE, Monday—I think you might be amused at a few of the airplane experiences I did not have space to tell you about yesterday.

On Saturday night, when I finished my lecture in Sacramento, the airline telephoned that they expected their 1:52 a.m. plane would leave on time from Oakland for Seattle. Mrs. Scheider left by train and I drove back to Oakland. It was a cold, damp drive, but this is, according to every Californian one meets, "most unusual weather." There is no doubt about it, everywhere one looked there was an excessive amount of water.

I arrived at the airport at about 1:30 and was told weather conditions to the north made it impossible to fly and so I took a room in the Hotel Oakland at 2:00 a.m. Even at this hour, seeing the wife of the President gave the elevator boy and the bellboy, who carried my bags, some excitement. As we entered the elevator one said to the other: "Do you see who this is?" The other nodded with a broad grin.

Though I was sleepy, I could not help but think how keenly interested the youth of America is in the personalities connected with those who represent them in government positions. It is grand to have them take an interest, but as an individual you must keep in mind that it is not in you the interest is centered, but just in "the wife of the President."

At 8:00 o'clock I called the airport and learned they expected the plane to leave at about 10:00 or ten-fifteen. I was up and ready when the airline bus came. There were only two passengers, but we picked up the pilot and hostess and at 10:15 we did take off. The trip was bumpy in spots and we flew through occasional squalls of rain and wind, but on the whole it was beautiful with the snowclad mountains beneath us.

When I got off the plane in Seattle around 3:40 p.m., I saw my family, but they had to wait until the usual photographs could be taken. Then, with a grandchild clinging to each arm, I stood and held a press interview in the airport with a crowd standing around us. I don't know how satisfactory it was to the press, but I thought it a very good idea, for the necessity for speed was so evident we finished in a very short time.

We spent the evening in quiet conversation. This morning Mrs. Scheider arrived. We are catching up on mail and now are going down to my daughter's office to go over the requests which she has for me to attend a great variety of things during my short stay here.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL