My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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FRESNO, Calif., Tuesday—We reached San Francisco about noon yesterday. It was fortunate for us that Mr. Paul Posz, the head of the bureau which had charge of my San Francisco lecture, came on board the train at Burlingame. It gave us an opportunity to discuss the plans for a very busy day. When we arrived at our hotel, we found a great deal of mail, a great many flowers and a telephone which never stopped ringing for more than three minutes.

Days such as yesterday are really very hectic. Neither Miss Chaney, Mrs. Scheider nor I, had enough time to eat lunch. We had a glass of milk and graham crackers and then sallied forth at 1:45, leaving piles of mail and telegrams unopened. Mr. George Creel, who is the United States Commissioner for the Golden Gate International Exposition, the Mayor, and representatives of the Army, Navy and Marines Corps, accompanied us to Treasure Island, where I was to assist in the ceremonies incidental to the breaking of ground for the Federal Building.

I think they have chosen a delightful name for this island, which has been built on an under-water bank with WPA labor. It will, eventually, be an airport. First, however, it will be the site of the 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition. We hope it will contain so many treasures of beauty and educational value, that the whole of the United States will profit by the work which has been done there.

We went through the streets preceded and followed by motorcycle policemen, in spite of my objection to noise. However, it did get us to our destination quickly.

On the way home we visited a nursery school, conducted in the Chinese YMCA, for little Chinese-Americans. Characteristic arrangements of water and flowers, which only oriental people seem to be able to produce, have given their building great charm. The children seemed happy and the same regime is carried as in any other nursery school. All their mothers work, so this school is a real help to them.

We left the nursery school, shed all our protective and formal escorts and wandered through Chinatown. The three of us visited one of the shops we had visited on a previous trip, and later made our way into the business section of the city to see a shop run by Miss Chaney's sisters. Back at the hotel, we had a number of visitors.

We finally had to ask to have our telephone cut off, or we would never have been dressed and had time to eat our dinner before Mr. Posz called for us to go to the lecture.

I was a little troubled by the prospect of speaking in the Civic Auditorium, but the arrangements were excellent. On account of the large number of people still coming in, we had to wait quite a while before going on the stage. However, I managed to get on the platform without too visible a case of stage-fright. After the lecture, we left immediately for Fresno.

The morning here has been busy. Two hours were spent visiting National Youth Administration projects. They are exceptionally interesting to me because they represent what can be done for agricultural youth and are also an achievement in cooperation between the Public Works Department of Fresno and the NYA

A number of young people have been taken on in every division of this Department and are obtaining excellent work training.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL