My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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FT. WORTH, Texas, Monday—I forgot to mention yesterday that I was leaving Washington at noon by plane. Also, I did not have space to tell you anything about the Newspaper Women's stunt dinner last Saturday night.

The sketches were cleverly written and went off so well that I feel sure none of our hosts were at all disturbed at having as an honor guest a lady who has done much to create the standards of the New York Theatre Guild. Science was also well represented among the honor guests of the evening, and radio and fashion were not forgotten either.

Every year the presiding chairman, who is also President of the Women's Press Club, does a most remarkable job of introducing the honor guests and saying something apt about each one. Doris Fleeson was no exception to the rule.

I have to divide myself into two parts in order to enjoy the sketches. Half of me tries to forget that at the end of the show I have to get up and be as amusing as possible, while the other half has to take note of everything which may be used when my turn comes to act. I enjoyed all of the show this year. In spite of my prophecy that they had used up all the things concerning me which would give them material for amusement, they managed to dig up several subjects out of the happenings of the past few months on which they wrote really witty and entertaining skits.

When the curtain falls on the newspaper women's entertainment and the horrible moment comes when I must do my share, I say a little prayer that the good time which everybody has had will carry them through the next few minutes. It usually does and everyone goes home happy.

Yesterday was a beautiful but windy day for flying. We could not leave Washington from our regular airport and had to drive out to Bolling Field. The mail also had to be brought out and we left half an hour late. Because of cross winds, we were further delayed during the first part of the trip, but we arrived in Fort Worth only half an hour late. We had gray skies over the mountains and for a little while we flew over the white, soft-looking clouds, which I always enjoy. There were a surprising number of passengers who had little boys and girls at home collecting autographs. All of them were as nice and considerate as possible and none asked me for my autograph in a crowd.

Just before we reached Dallas, a young man, who knew Franklin, Jr., because he had been with him at a friend's house in Providence, R.I., came to talk with me. One of the autograph seekers was particularly nice and told me he wanted my signature for the daughter of a neighbor who was a good Democrat, although he, himself, was a New Hampshire Republican.

Elliott and Ruth met me and we have had a wonderful morning looking over their place and noting every improvement. Chandler and Elliott, Jr., are recovering from their colds and, in spite of days in bed, seem happy.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL