My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Thursday—We had two teas yesterday afternoon. The first one was for the Society of Sponsors, who are the christeners of Naval ships and come together for a meeting once a year. Last year I went to their luncheon, but this year, having another engagement at the luncheon hour, I invited them to have tea with me. I was much interested to see my co-sponsors from many different states.

At 5:00 o'clock we had a larger tea and to this my little granddaughter, Chandler, came as a hostess with me, for she had no playmates and was a bit lonely. I told her she could help the butlers see that the guests were fed, if she was very careful not to drop a plate! Before long, however, I found her next to me shaking hands with our guests. A little later she was piloting me towards the elevator as fast as she could, with the idea of getting more attention for herself and less for the tea guests!

Our invalids are improving today. Mrs. Elliott Roosevelt arrived last night, which was a great pleasure and comfort for her children, and a pleasure and relief to me.

I have seldom had as delightful an evening of music as we had last night. Mr. Rene Le Roy played the flute and Mr. Leveque, a French pianist, accompanied him and played a number of additional selections for us. This is Mr. Leveque's first trip to this country, but Mr. Le Roy has come to me for a number of years ever since he brought me a letter of introduction on his initial trip to the United States.

I hoped to have a visit this week from a young American singer who sang for us here when he was still in college. He has been giving concerts in England for the last year or more. He came back for a short visit and I was most anxious to hear him again, but he had engagements in England which he returned to fill and I fear we have missed seeing him on this trip.

The President came in late yesterday evening and the first person who met him this morning marvelled how rested he looked after five days in the country. There is nothing so beneficial as a return to the surroundings of your youth.

I have just come from a luncheon with the District of Columbia League of Women Voters. They are the one voteless League and feel their lack of direct power. In spite of that, I think they are doing a remarkable piece of work. The reports from their committee chairmen were concise and interesting.

The play presented by Mrs. David Cushman Coyle's committee on the relief situation in Washington, was so well done I felt I was actually in a relief office facing a real situation. These situations can be duplicated all over the country again and again. I only wish every citizen could sit behind the desk for a half a day in any one of the relief headquarters and listen to the stories. It would help us to a true sense of values and give us a better picture of the needs of the people of the country.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL