My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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Here I am back in Washington after a rather diversified two days! I filed my column yesterday morning in Fargo, North Dakota, and it was lucky for me in several ways that I was forehanded, for soon after I had finished it, a number of ladies kindly came to visit me at the airport. They were full of kindly suggestions, and wanted to take me to see their city. They offered me all kinds of hospitality, but we were waiting for the airport in Minneapolis to clear sufficiently for landing purposes and I have learned that it is well to stay where you are, for news may come suddenly. Sure enough the pilot came out and announced suddenly: "we take off in five minutes."

I hoped this meant that we would make Chicago by air. We only made Minneapolis, however, and then we were driven over to a train which brought us into Chicago at seven-thirty a.m. It was most comfortable and delightful train, with very excellent food, but as my interest was entirely in reaching home, I didn't relax and enjoy myself in the way that might have been possible under other conditions. I was met in Chicago by Mr. C. R. Smith who said that the "ceiling" had been variable all day, but he hoped that when we reached their airport it would be over five hundred feet so I could make the rest of my journey by air. At eight o'clock it was clearing and I completed my trip by plane.

I greeted my nephew, Henry Roosevelt, and his sister, Eleanor, at eight-thirty breakfast and from then on I have been busy picking up the threads of life here. I find my mother-in-law, and my sister-in-law are perfectly well and enjoying themselves, and all the plans for tonight's party are completed. The house is full of young and the atmosphere would be perfect if several people had not already confided in me that Christmas had been a little too much for them! One of the household has gone to bed with intercostal neuralagia and one of our guests is in bed with a cold, and I am just praying for no more casualties. Those who are well seem to be very well, and I am certainly glad to see the boys. My daughter-in-law, Betsey, has done many things for me while I have been gone, and I realize more and more how thankful one should be for people who can carry on some of the activities which you may have to drop yourself. Of course, if it were not for Mrs. Scheider and Mrs. Helm we would all of us be lost most of the time.

I think I know how Ulysses must have felt when he came back from journeys! Everybody has been treating me as though I had been on a real adventuresome trip. As a matter of fact if it were not for the uncertainty of every move nothing could have been more comfortable. Judging by the signs around me I feel that the next few days will be busy but very pleasant.

E.R.
TMsd 30 December 1937, AERP, FDRL