My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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FT. WAYNE, Ind., Wednesday—Everyone I see is concerned about the President's tooth and I was also when James telephoned me about it last evening just before I went to my lecture. I hope that all will soon be well, however. It is a coincidence that he and the Vice-President have similarly suffered on the same day.

We drove from Akron to Orrville this morning to catch a train and Congressman Thom had asked me to hold a reception for the Democratic women in Orrville. Our hostess threw her house open and I had the pleasure of meeting a number of Democratic women from nearby towns as well. Then we proceeded to the station, where the high school band played for us, and the children let out early from school seemed to fill every inch of open space. Two freight trains went by while we were waiting, and I prayed that the officers would succeed in keeping the children off the tracks. When finally our train came in and we got on and it pulled out, Mrs. Scheider who is always much concerned about children, said with a sigh of relief: "I'm glad that is over!"

Our first flurry of snow drove past the train windows during the morning hours today, but after a while the sun shone fitfully and then gave up and hid itself behind a gray and leaden sky.

In Fort Wayne, as I was saying good-bye to the reporters this afternoon, a young man said to me: "This is my first experience interviewing some one of importance, and I haven't dared ask the questions I wanted to ask." I assured him I was no person of importance and if he had only known it, I was feeling most inadequate and humble about answering the questions he finally did ask.

At my press conference yesterday in Akron some sweet young girls sat on the floor and asked me naively what I thought of journalism as a career for women. I wonder what are the attributes of a really successful woman newspaper reporter.

These young people come from high school and college papers with questions which would fill a book if you answered them really comprehensively, and to this day with all my contact with newspaper writers and writers of every kind, it would be difficult for me to say what I thought the ideal temperament was for such a job, or the ideal training, or the ideal way of handling the job when you have got it and it isn't so easy to get. These snap judgments which one must give on a hundred and one different questions from young people, are one of the things I think most difficult, for there is a great responsibility to be honest with youth, and as far as you are able to give the best of your experience.

Here I also met a woman who interviewed me in Evansville, Indiana, back in the campaign of 1920 and she remarked that at that time I talked about my children who were playing with their sand pails somewhere on the coast of Maine. That seems a long while ago!

E.R.
TMsd 17 November 1937, AERP, FDRL