My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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DANVILLE, Ill., Wednesday—I have discovered that one occasionally has anxieties in keeping one's appointments on these lecture trips, even when one travels conservatively and thinks plenty of time is allowed!

We are now waiting rather anxiously for a belated train from the south, with a connection to make in Chicago and very little spare time after our arrival in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, where my engagement is tonight. There seems to be nothing to do about it but to hope that we catch our train out of Chicago!

This is Armistice Day, and for my generation I doubt if that day can ever come around without a memory of the sense of relief which swept over us when we first heard that the Armistice was signed.

In a book which I read recently, "The Late George Apley," the gentleman is pictured as having been grieved because we did not follow up the Allies Victory and march into Berlin. There were, I know, a few people in this country who felt that way, but the majority of us I believe had little vindictiveness in our hearts against our enemies. We were thankful that friend and foe alike would no longer have to lie in Flanders Fields.

The papers record today that in Germany no Armistice Day ceremonies will be held. I hope that over here we will continue to remember this day and that it will serve always to renew our reverance for those who served our country, but at the same time that it will emphasize our determination to prevent the recurrance of war.

I had a letter the other day from a committee of young women in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania. They are members of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, and they feel that if possible, children should not be given dangerous toys such as air rifles, toy guns, pointed arrows, etc., as toys. It is their idea that parents in buying their Christmas presents, should attempt to find things which are not in themselves hazardous for the children, and which at the same time will not encourage the children's interest in the type of game which is concerned either with the activities of war or of crime. It seems to me there is something in this idea, and perhaps we older people do not give thought enough to the influence we can have on youthful minds through choosing their toys judiciously. I understand that this year the makers of toys have laid great emphasis on mechanical toys and building materials for constructing miniature towns, bridges and railroads. This seems to me a healthier interest on the whole.

A letter has come to me here which is naively amusing. It is unsigned, but it begs me to praise all those who find jobs and stick to them, adding that there is a young man who has done this and helped thereby to support his mother and five sisters and all the praise he gets is the suggestion that he should marry! Somehow I have the idea that a little self-interest prompted that letter.

E.R.
TMsd 11 November 1937, AERP, FDRL