My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—Some one told me yesterday that I was advertising the month of October, and I think perhaps he is right! It certainly is a gorgeous month. The wind started to blow yesterday and this is the month of November! The leaves are gone and only the green evergreens lighten up the brown and gray look of the woods. Have you ever noticed how delicious the water in a stream will look when the wind blows across it and starts myriads of little waves dancing? Our brook it seems to me, has a cleaner look just now than at any other season of the year. The blue of the sky and the scudding white clouds seem to be reflected in it and turn it a cold but delicious looking blue.

We have a little girl staying with us and she took me straight back to my youth this morning, when on coming out of the house, she saw a pile of leaves on the lawn and made one dash and jumped into it. She had never been on a horse so after my ride, we put her on "Dot" and led her around. There is no doubt about it, one should do all the outdoor things when one is very young. She showed no signs of fear, sat up as straight as possible with her feet in the small stirrups which had been put onto my saddle, held the reins in her hand and went off down the drive calling to the police dog to follow, with perfect self-confidence.

Since mentioning one school paper the other day, it has been brought to my attention that I left out a number of others that cover the same field. "The American Observer," "The Junior Review" and "The Weakly News Review," besides a number of others of equally high standing. In praising one, I meant of course, to include all of those that work along the same lines to increase the interest, the general knowledge and the high ideals of the students in our schools. Many private and public schools publish their own magazines and this practice has of course an additional value in that the young people learn the mechanical end of getting out a magazine or a paper. My own short experience in making up dummies and getting material for a little political publication, has always been of value to me, and therefore I think that these papers which the young people get out themselves are of more value perhaps than those which come to them and represent no effort of their own. Whatever really interests young people and encourages the habit of reading so that they keep up not only with the current events of their own environment, but the current events of the world at large is good training for general living in a democracy.

This seems to be a quiet, peaceful day which has not been the case with us for some time, and I am hoping that nothing will occur to disturb this really quiet Sunday. The President has a vestry meeting this afternoon and I've heard of no other engagements!

E.R.
TMsd 31 October 1937, AERP, FDRL