My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Sunday—I went to see "Susan and God" last night, and I can recommend it to anyone who wants an entertaining evening with a few moments of real emotion to point up the lighter vein. Miss Crothers makes gentle fun perhaps of a certain religious movement, but the real barbs of her wit are directed against a certain type of woman who fools herself successfully even if she does not fool her friends.

There are few of us who do not know Susans and Barries and Blossoms. Some of the lines are quite priceless as when Susan announces she wishes she had never heard of God! The play is well cast and very well acted, and only the last curtain left me with a rather let down feeling. Could Susan really be honest with herself or anyone else? And why is it that people like Charlotte who really are the ones with character and who face life with courage so rarely charm the people they love? The Susans of the world seem to have it all over the Charlottes which is not a very good lesson for the younger generation!

We were a little slow in coming out of the theatre last night and found the rain making it a little more difficult to get a taxicab. Everyone in the world it seemed to me, offered to come to our assistance and each new person found it a little harder to return to us with the desired vehicle. With my usual impatience I dragged my poor companion through the rain towards Broadway, insisting that I could get a taxi there. Finally I took pity on her reluctance to be dragged any further and walked through the Hotel Astor and waited under the canopy on the 44th Street side until the doorman really did get us a conveyance.

I always want to be moving and feel sure that I myself can get what I want more quickly than anyone else, which is perfectly all right if you are alone, but not so good if you are subjecting some one else to your vagaries.

It is still raining this morning and I am beginning to be apprehensive that many of our lovely colored leaves will have been torn off their branches when we reach Hyde Park this afternoon. When I was young I got a great deal of amusement in shuffling my feet through the leaves which had been raked up under the trees and I loved an autumn bonfire of leaves and bits of branches which the wind had blown down. Alas, that is another thing which I do not enjoy so much now, for it means to me the end of summer with its freedom.

I am lunching today with the Young Men's Board of Trade and they have kindly submitted to me some questions as I felt a little inadequate to make a speech which could be of interest to this particular group. I am rather doubtful if anyone outside of a government official could answer some of the questions submitted! Fortunately, they are all matters of opinion and I suppose we all of us have a right to have an opinion whether it is right or wrong!

E.R.
TMsd 28 October 1937, AERP, FDRL