My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Wednesday—I had an amusing experience last night at the broadcasting station. Not having written out my speech, I suggested that I might not finish exactly on the second, and was told that someone there would fill in for me on the piano. The piano was carefully opened and everything was in preparation in case I ran out of ideas before my time was finished! Just before the broadcast was to begin, they asked if the press could come in and listen as there was no advance manuscript, and six reporters came in and sat facing me on the stiff little chairs looking very formidable. To my great surprise I recognized among them one of the members of my Washington press conference! Why is it when you are away from your usual surroundings, it gives you an added pleasure to see someone whom you did not expect to see? I would have been glad to see this girl in Washington, but I was even more pleased to see her in Boston where all the other faces were strange to me.

Mrs. Haven Clark and Anne, who were with me, had never been inside a broadcasting station before and were much interested and somewhat appalled by the camera men who waited to snap our pictures on the way out. I left them at their house, and proceeded to gather my bags and get on the night train for New York City.

Six-thirty this morning brought a knock on my door and I reached my apartment early and was ready to start out on a round of errands at ten-thirty. I am finishing the buying of my winter clothes and starting on my Christmas list. That will take a long time to finish and I foresee that I shall be running in and out of shops wherever I am during the next month trying to accumulate all the things that I must have before December 25th.

We had lunch on our porch at the apartment today and the sun was shining in so brightly that we were actually almost too warm. One treasures every one of the meals out of doors these days and every chance to go without a coat for one realizes that winter will soon be with us!

On Sunday I thought winter was here, for we actually were threatened with a snowstorm as we drove up to Syracuse. Some one "cheered" me up by telling me that they understood this was to be one of the worst winters on record, with one blizzard following on the heels of another all through January and February. I am somewhat dismayed for I had hoped to run away to the country whenever I had a chance over a weekend, but if we are going to have blizzards I shall have to give it up, for to drive into our cottage when there is deep snow on the ground is practically impossible. It drifts in the cuts to eight feet and there is no way of really enjoying a visit there, you have got to be prepared to live there and not mind if you are snowed in!

E.R.
TMsd 27 October 1937, AERP, FDRL