My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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CHICAGO, Friday—I took off from Seattle last night by air after returning from a most interesting day.

The weather in the morning was most unkind and sheets of rain poured down upon us as we drove to the dock, but by the time we reached Victoria, British Columbia, the rain had stopped and there were some signs of clearing.

Our two grandchildren were much excited and as a result before the end of the trip, one of them came in to our stateroom with a request that he remain there as together they were making life a little difficult both for each other and any one else around them. I have often found that a little peace and quiet is a very good thing for children on all day trips, and I was impressed again with the wisdom of our Canadian hosts when I found they had arranged an exclusive meal in a separate room for our youngsters so they would not have the excitement of a big luncheon table and the conversation of the grown-ups.

Victoria is a charming city and as we drove past the Houses of Parliament, the Prime Minister told me that he had spent twenty-one years serving in one capacity or another, in the government of his province.

When it was really clear, the view from the windows of Government House must be gorgeous and they told me that all the flowers which were in great profusion everywhere throughout the rooms, came from their own garden. Everyone was most kind and hospitable and both the Lieutenant-Governor and my husband seemed in a happy mood when they made their respective speeches, the Lieutenant-Governor proposing a toast to the President of the United States, and my husband proposing the usual toast to the kind.

On leaving after lunch we drove along the shore to the dock, and I longed for the sun. It must be a beautiful drive with the sunlight on the water, and I envied the people with houses looking across the water at the Olympic Range which in clear weather stands out in its full beauty.

The Prime Minister told me that he had boasted once to an American Naval Officer about the view from his house and the officer had replied: "Don't forget that a great part of it is given you by the United States."

We had to change from the destroyer on which my husband was travelling to the escorting destroyer, and could not go into Port Angelus with them because the time for making our plane in Seattle was drawing near.

I am returning by plane tonight because months ago I promised to open the Herald Tribune Forum Conference which begins next Monday morning, and I know too well that we may be held up by the weather and so dare not put off my trip until the last minute.

Mrs. Scheider and I crossed in a small boat from one destroyer to the other, and had none too much time for my plane connection. She had a little more time as her train left an hour later.

E.R.
TMsd 1 October 1937, AERP, FDRL