My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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BOISE, Idaho, Monday—We all regretted leaving Yellowstone Park yesterday, for our afternoon was one of the most interesting we have had on the trip. Two of the geysers, the Daisy and Old Faithful performed very well for us. Strange to say in both cases, I was not disappointed. The water shooting up in the air, or in the case of the Daisy out sideways, was most graceful and the rainbows added to the beauty. I think the colors, looking down into some of the hot pools seemed more beautiful than almost anything else. Nature combines so many colors and has so much to teach us where this is concerned. If only we realized it, it is the shades that matter, almost any colors go well together.

I wonder why we all of us have such an urge to leave something of ourselves in every place we visit. In one very lovely pool, people have thrown little metal discs which are tax tokens so the park has had to clean this pool out on several occasions! In other places the people have carved their initials so there is hardly anything of the rock formation to be seen. In still other places they have chipped pieces of stone off in their effort to carry away a souvenir, entirely forgetting that they are not the only people who are moved in the same manner and when half a million or so people indulge in this desire, it does eventually make a dent on nature. I suppose it is all a matter of education and self-control, and older people are just as guilty as young people, so we will just have to wait until the nation grows up and in the meantime we will have to guard our beauty spots as best we can.

Mrs. Pope, wife of Senator Pope, was the first to greet me this morning and reminded me at once of the Idaho WPA Guide, which was one of the first to be written and which she thinks very satisfactory. Everyone of these guides which I have seen is a good piece of work, so I am sure this one is also.

A group of ladies came to the train also this morning and among them were two newspaper girls. They said they represented the female side of the press, and so we chatted for a few minutes. They were seriously handicapped, however, because every time they asked me a personal question, they felt they must apologize. I hope their interview was satisfactory to them!

Today is a most glorious day, and the sun is so warm that our fur coats were discarded as we drove through the streets of Boise, Idaho. My husband had been told they would take him past all the schools and would he please wave at the children. They certainly kept their word and the children were out in full force at every school. There was a cadet corps which I imagine was in connection with the high school, which did some of the policing of the streets. Either the people here are very amenable or the policing was exceptionally good, for even at the spot where the President, the Senators, the Governor and the Mayor all made short speeches, there was no crowding or disorder.

E.R.
TMsd 27 September 1937, AERP, FDRL