My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Monday—While I was still at breakfast this morning, the Secretary of the Treasury arrived. He announced that the President had asked him to come as early as possible and he had agreed to be there at six a.m., but the President had postponed it until nine! He was there ahead of time, so he sat and talked with me.

This is a most glorious day and we started out early this morning or as early as I could get my youngest son to limber up. He thought that climbing mountains in Scotland after game had put him in very excellent condition, but the baseball game with the "Nine Old Men" yesterday must have been quite strenuous for he confesses today to being a bit stiff. However, when we came in from our ride he jumped his horse over the jumps in the field. Mrs. Henry Leach and Miss Dorothy Straus who were driving down the avenue on their way to call on the President, told me that both he and the horse seemed to be in excellent condition.

The President took a short drive this morning and this afternoon he is going over the backroads as he does on every trip up here. I hope he will stop for a few minutes at the picnic which Miss Nancy Cook is giving to the Democratic women from Syracuse. This group has entertained the Democratic women of the State so often when conventions and meetings have been held in Syracuse that the picnic today is a kind of return celebration. It seems somewhat cold to eat out of doors but I feel in the sun it will be pleasantly warm.

We are all much troubled by the lack of success in finding the "Endeavor." Anybody who sails yachts can not help but be interested in the safe arrival of this boat at her destination. We all hope that no real harm has come to her, though boats of this kind are not built to weather heavy storms at sea. The mere fact that the British challenger has to cross the ocean is one of the handicaps under which the loser of the race always has to sail, for even to cross in good weather requires a stauncher boat than needs to be built for sailing the race in home waters.

Someone sent me an old clipping telling the story of the ice-boat races which used to be held on the Hudson River at Poughkeepsie many years ago and among the boats mentioned is one on which my husband has often told me he sailed many times. Since I have lived here, I remember only one winter when the ice was thick enough for much ice-boating and I imagine keeping the River open as they do for shipping to go up to Albany will make it out of the question ever again to have much ice boating.

I am going to New York this afternoon to do a law last errands before getting off for the west. One always departs in a rush but it does make one do many things that one keeps putting off.

E.R.
TMsd 20 September 1937, AERP, FDRL