My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

HYDE PARK, Sunday—A little before eight last evening I heard a cheery voice outside my door and our youngest son, John, had arrived from Nahant, Massachusetts with his fiancee, Miss Anne Clark! He has inherited one of his father's traits. He usually arrives a little ahead of the time that he tells you he will get in. Some of the other members of the family usually arrive a little behind time!

Dr. Homer Rainey came up from Washington yesterday afternoon to spend the night, and he told me the two year period of the survey on the youth situation and their needs which his commission has carried on, is drawing to a close and many of the surveys are completed. Two of the results of this survey are interesting. He says that the first demand of every youngster is for a job, and there is a growing realization that having a skill of some kind facilitates getting that job. The second is for training for marriage and home life. Many of them complain that their parents have not prepared them and that the school has done little for them in getting them ready for this most important part of their life. I am waiting eagerly some of the conclusions which this commission will arrive at as a result of the facts which have been brought to light. I think it should help us greatly in the educational field.

Miss Dickerman and I were asking Dr. Rainey if he had come to any conclusions, as a by-product of these surveys, on the most valuable service that private schools for boys and girls could render today. Private schools reach but a small number of people and their justification must lie in the fact that they make a contribution which public schools are not able to make. I feel that the private schools should do the real educational experimentation and the pioneer work in pointing the way to better preparation for meeting the new problems which will confront the generation growing up today.

I was out on the porch to greet the President when he arrived this morning and we went in to breakfast at once. They tell me a very great number of telegrams have been received since his speech on the Constitution, and most of them seem to indicate that the people liked the idea that the Constitution was a layman's document which does not require a lawyer's interpretation.

John and Anne and I started out to ride after breakfast and just as we went out it started to rain. After going around the field once, we came home and got ready for church. I would not ordinarily have given up so quickly but I had visions of my hair being completely soaked and having to sit through the service with a hat pulled down over a very wet head of hair!

Some friends for lunch and then John and Anne and Captain Harrison went off to the ball game at Mr. Lowell Thomas' on Quaker Hill. I wanted to go also, but the idea of going off on Wednesday is beginning to weigh me down and I am remembering all the things which should be done and which have not been done.

E.R.
TMsd 19 September 1937, AERP, FDRL