My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Wednesday—Our County Fair brings people together who rarely meet anywhere else! It is an amusing thing to see people again whom you haven't seen for a long time. Some of them do not change at all, some of them grow up and except for a family resemblance you would find it hard to recognize the chubby little child whom you knew years ago in the tall, slim girl or boy.

Yesterday a very handsome, slim young woman, with black hair brushed straight back from her forehead, came up to me and for a minute I hesitated. Then my mind went back to the old days when I was growing up in Tivoli and I recognized the youngest of a group of cousins who lived in the place next to my grandmother's. She was Pauline Clarkson then, and I could not have called her anything but Pauline yesterday if my life had depended on it, though she is married and has of course another last name today.

There were some beautiful horses and ponies being shown but the farm teams impressed me the most. Some of the strongest and finest horses that I have ever seen were in the ring and driving around the field. The exhibits by individual farmers where they had gathered together everything that was produced on their farm interested me greatly. The variety was quite astonishing and the arrangement was often very artistic.

I was quite proud of my sister-in-law's gardener who won several prizes with his vegetables and had besides a most beautiful exhibit of flowers.

Four or five of us walked down the long street where the side shows were set up, and I was sorely tempted to stop and try to catch the little white balls which I saw being tossed about in one booth, but I realized that if I did there would probably be a crowd around us in a few minutes. Instead we all had ice cream cones!

The 4-H Club booths were interesting as always and I liked the idea they have this year of group prizes. I also liked the opportunity they give the girls not only to make individual garments but to gather together a complete outfit. This shows their taste in shoes, gloves, hats and pocketbooks and is valuable as the judges give them criticism from the point of view of what is becoming and suitable.

For the first time they had a stamp exhibit and I wish my husband could have seen it.

We dined with my sister-in-law last night and her new Scottie puppy, a lady with all the timid attributes of a lady, completely won my husband's affections. She lay in his arms with complete contentment and at four months old knew enough to put her cold nose up against his check and gently lick him.

The fog is heavy from the river every morning, but the sun seems to burn through in the day time. Mrs. Scheider and I are starting off for a picnic in Connecticut.

E.R.
TMsd 1 September 1937, AERP, FDRL