My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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INDIANAPOLIS, Friday—We arrived in Indianapolis at eight-twenty-three, which by our watches was really ten-twenty-three, so we felt we had had a good night's sleep! An attractive looking young man greeted us, and one or two other badges indicated members of the young Democratic group, while in the background stood the usual photographers and a few newspaper people. They were firmly told to come to the hotel later.

Arrived at our hotel, we dressed and had our breakfast, a few more photographs were taken, a little more time was given to the press, and then my son, James, appeared and we went over to the Convention Hall. There were many old friends to greet, and many new friends to meet, and I was happy to see the Governor and the Mayor. When I firmly settled down and was looking over my notes, my eye was caught by a most remarkable costume on a lady Democrat in the front row. When we stood during the Star-Spangled Banner instead of thinking only of my patriotic duty my eyes were glued on the most remarkable design meandering down the lady's front—the main center picture being the most gorgeous horse, in red I think, and even when she sat down and the design was obliterated, the colors were most striking. I would have given a great deal to be able to go down and examine that embroidery. However, with the beginning of the Governor's speech, I began to be really interested in what was being said to these young Democrats.

Most of the delegates are young but they seem to have a good many visitors! I have come to the conclusion that we old foggies like to associate with the young, for I saw a number of people quite as old as I am down in the audience, listening with great attention and clapping as appreciatively as though the speeches had been addressed to them.

James made a good speech and the Hall was fairly well crowded, which speaks well for the interest taken by these young Democratic clubs, for it is hot weather! The Hall holds nine thousand people and is looked upon as a rather warm spot and yet it was fairly full and the audience was most attentive.

It is good to feel there is this activity among the younger Democrats, for these Young Democratic Clubs will furnish the leadership and help to form the public opinion in their various communities. Their willingness to take the trouble to come to a convention and talk over their beliefs and lay out a plan of activity augurs well for their future responsibility as citizens.

At the end of the morning session I went over with Mr. John Jennings, WPA Administrator to see the Children's Museum. This museum is ten years old, the director, Mr. Carr told me he had been greatly helped by Dr. Putnam of the Congressional Library. In any case it is most interestingly done and the public school children of Indianapolis are fortunate indeed to have this to add to the interest of their education. The WPA workers who have so successfully assisted them in developing their collections and in preparing their loan groups are certainly doing a wonderful piece of work.

Mrs. James M. Helm came up to Grayville to see us. We were happy to see her as she left us in May when the social season came to an end. I am about to join the Young Democrats again for their afternoon reception.

E.R.
TMs 20 August 1937, AERP, FDRL