My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Tuesday—On Sunday afternoon I stopped to talk to a friend of mine who has a fruit and vegetable stand between here and Red Hook on the Albany Post Road, and I wish that I could convey to you a little of the pride I feel in this woman's quite evident achievement. I have watched that stand grow for a number of years now, and its products show how the farm has grown as well. Somehow or other, I have a feeling that Mrs. Hamm is growing also. She presented me with a basket of beautiful cherries. She takes a great interest in the Historical Society and asked me if I was going to be able to speak for them in September or October and then said: "Someday when you have time, won't you stop long enough to let me have a chance to ask you a number of questions? There are so many things I would like to talk about."

Mrs. Hamm told me once that she went to meetings of every political variety because she liked to know every side of a question. She radiates health and strength and activity of mind and body, and must be a force in the community.

While I was waiting for my fruit, a boy who was buying some cherries came over and held his basket out asking if I would have some. Then he said he was from Brooklyn and had been to a lake back of Hudson, New York, for the weekend. He wished my husband and me good luck and I felt that I had been talking to a friend, so when Mrs. Scheider got back in the car, she demanded of me: "Who is your friend?" I answered: "I haven't the slightest idea, except that he comes from Brooklyn."

Yesterday afternoon I motored down to Mrs. Morgenthau's where I am spending a couple of nights. Before very long she and her family will leave the river for their usual summer vacation, and I do not want her to get away without seeing all I can of her. I know no one who has succeeded better than she has in giving her children an interest in general affairs and it makes them the most delightful companions. I always look forward hopefully to their being at home when I go to visit her.

We spent the morning swimming and motoring about the farm and enjoying the perfectly glorious view of the mountains. We are about to start now to motor across to Westport, Connecticut, to see Miss Lillian Wald.

I am afraid that there is no more encouraging news to be hoped for about Amelia Earhart, and much as I hate to acknowledge defeat, I think we will have to accept what seems now a certainty that she is added to the list of people who have lost their lives in the interest of adventure and science. She would have it so, I know, and would not regret going, but those of us who knew her and felt her value can not help but regret the loss to all of us. I only hope that it will spur us on to do something in her memory which will carry on the influence which her personality and spirit brought to everyone with whom she came in contact.

E.R.
TMsd 13 July 1937, AERP, FDRL