My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—It certainly was a delightful feeling on Friday afternoon to get into a bathing suit, lie in the sun and then cool off in the pool. I could not indulge myself for very long as I discovered that one must go shopping if one is going to have anything in the house to eat, so Mrs. Scheider and I had to get into her car and drive down to Poughkeepsie.

In the evening I went over at nine o'clock to a Roosevelt Home Club meeting at the home of our neighbor, Moses Smith, who rents my husband's farm. They had quite a gathering, a bad thunderstorm in the early evening had forced them to go indoors, but every room and the porches were filled with people. I talked much too long, but it is rather nice to talk to one's neighbors when you haven't seen them in quite a long while, one of the members of the club had donated water melon so we all sat around and ate it to our heart's content.

Yesterday we did our shopping in the morning and at twelve o'clock a gentleman who has been working with me on a very difficult problem in Dutchess Junction came to report on his efforts and to ask for a little assistance. We have a group of people living there under unsanitary and altogether inadquate housing conditions.

Mrs. Charles Fayerweather and her two children came down from New Lebanon, New York, to swim and have lunch, and Mrs. William Brown Meloney came over from Quaker Hill, so six of us sat on the porch and tried to forget how hot it was by talking about things that interested us, and eating a very light lunch. After lunch Mrs. Meloney and I had a nice talk together and then Mrs. Fayerweather and I discussed at some length two projects in which she is interested in her county and which are very akin to some which interest me here. For a week beginning on the seventeenth of July, there will be an arts and crafts exhibit and sale from two p.m. to nine p.m. every day in New Lebanon, in the hope of showing what their people are able to do in the way of handwork!

It was after four o'clock before everyone went home and I got into my riding clothes and went for a long ride in the woods. The sun was still pretty hot and the flies were not pleasant for either man or beast. However, the horses didn't seem to mind any more than I did and when I got back I had a swim in the pool and a quiet evening at my desk.

This morning we started early, very early in fact, to picnic with some friends and got back in time for a ride.

My thoughts keep flying out to the Pacific Ocean and hoping against hope that good news may still come of Amelia Earhart and her navigator. I shall always be grateful to Mr. Walter Lippman for what he wrote in his column about Amelia—no one could have done it more beautifully.

E.R.
TMsd 11 July 1937, AERP, FDRL