My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Tuesday—I have scanned the papers with such anxiety since Friday evening when I first heard over the radio that Amelia Earhart and her pilot were missing. I never feel like giving up hope for anyone who has courage, until every possible chance of rescue is over, for I think resourceful, courageous people will fight with every means at hand until they are completely worn out. This morning I feel more hopeful than before and I am hanging on the end of the telephone hoping to hear good news of her.

I feel sure that if she comes through safely she will feel that what she has learned makes it all worthwhile but her friends will wish that science could be served without quite so much risk to a fine person whom many people love as a person and not as a pilot or adventurer.

There is in Washington, a really fine A Capella Choir which is at present singing for a short time at the Chautauqua Institute in Chautauqua, New York. Mrs. Stahl, who has mothered this choir, writes me that for a long time she has hoped that she could induce people who are interested in music to help on the promising voices that she may discover by offering some "voice scholarships." I do not know just what she has in mind, but I have long thought that these choirs are valuable in any community because they help to develop community singing and community singing has a double purpose. It gives the people who partake a certain amount of training, but at the same time it enhances their appreciation of music and educated the community as a whole to be more music conscious. Therefore, I would be interested in seeing small scholarships established which would enable young people to join these choruses or choirs and receive enough remuneration to give them a boost in whatever work they might be doing on the outside.

We have had a quiet few days with few visitors, James arrived on Sunday morning, and he and Betsey left Monday evening, and so did my husband.

One visitor only remained and this morning at seven-thirty we rode for two hours in the woods and survived the mosquitoes and flies.

The picnic Sunday for the newspaper fraternity was fairly cool and in consequences everyone could enjoy even the sunny spots on the lawn. Our foreign guests Professor and Mrs. Ludwig were a little surprised by the informality of the occasion and explained that what they called a garden party for the press in Europe would require top hats and frock coats. No one would engage in any activity but bowing over the tea cups. "And, where" he asked, "are the military?" We explained as best we could that we did not need soldiers, but we realized that our ways are hard for European biographers to understand.

E.R.
TMsd 6 July 1937, AERP, FDRL