My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Friday—The President does enjoy Hyde Park! Anyone seeing him start off yesterday afternoon with six people packed into his very small car, much after the manner of sardines, would hardly believe that he had a care in the world! France, England, Spain, Japan, Germany and Italy, and all the other nations have a little niche somewhere in his mind in case some question arises involving the interests of the United States. All the numerous problems can be turned to at a moment's notice, but for the afternoon he was on vacation. It is a blessed provision of nature when you are able to forget everything else and be completely absorbed in the interest of the moment. My husband has this ability to a marked degree.

Miss LeHand and I drove into Poughkeepsie to go to the telegraph office, to the post office and the grocer's for someone has to attend to the everyday needs of life. Then Dr. and Mrs. Hendrik Van Loon and a protege of theirs, a very musical and charming young lady, Miss Castagnetta, spent on hour with me. Mr. Van Loon and I were doing a little work together, the others wandered around the garden and sat by the pool and then came in to join us for iced coffee and cookies before they started on their drive back to Connecticut. He brought the President some Dutch herring and other Dutch delicacies which will I know be much enjoyed.

It is so cold for this season of the year that I can hardly realize the second of July is with us. I slept under a heavy blanket last night, an almost unheard of procedure on the Hudson River in summer!

Up at seven-fifteen this morning to breakfast with Anna and John who were taking their numerous bags into New York in my car. I will go with them to the airport this afternoon, and after seeing them off will drive the car home. It is just as well when I am saying good-bye to the children for me to have something that has to be done to hold my attention immediately afterwards for I always hate to see any of them fly off to distant parts.

Mrs. Scheider and I came down to New York a little later in the morning by train and we will be followed later by my mother-in-law and Johnny and his friends. Tomorrow morning at ten o'clock I shall be starting with them for the steamer. They do not sail until noon but after I look the boat over and see them settled I shall probably leave them for it never seems to me very sensible to stand on the dock and wave a handkerchief until the boat has disappeared! I shall then pick up my car and motor back to Hyde Park where Betsey and my husband will have been joined by Dr. and Mrs. Emil Ludwig. I rather think this will be the last of the farewells that I shall be saying in person.

E.R.
TMsd 2 July 1937, AERP, FDRL