My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Thursday—Here we are back at Hyde Park. The reception last night seemed very gay, but on account of the rain many people had great difficulty in getting there, and therefore it was long drawn out. I hate to think of the hour at which people from out of town must have reached their homes:

The wedding party never sat down for their own supper until nearly ten o'clock, and when I think of the long day and the nervous strain I wonder how Franklin and Ethel stood it. I hope that soon they may have absolute peace and quiet for a time at least, so that life may return again to something resembling normal.

We all got off the train at Highland at different times this morning, and many of those alighting looked a little weary as though they had not had all the sleep they needed.

Miss Cook, Mrs. Scheider and I, being accustomed to these trips, had our breakfast before leaving the train which somehow always makes one face the day with a little more equanimity. It began to rain and for a few minutes we had quite a little storm, but luckily it has cleared off again, and I am sure that all my children who are most anxious to ride today, will get a chance to visit all the spots they particularly want to see. Elliott and Ruth did not come up because he had to be in New York on business, and James had to go back to Washington, so only Betsey, Anna, John and Johnny are here.

In the hurry of departure last night, some of them evidently did not pack as carefully as they should, for Johnny joined me at breakfast this morning to announce that he did not even have a comb in his bag! That seemed easy to replace. As he sails for Europe on Saturday morning, however, I am hoping that nothing more important is lost:

Anna and John go to New York tomorrow and depart before long for Seattle and I will go down to see Johnny and his friend, John Drayton, and my mother-in-law off for Europe Saturday morning. Luckily some old friends of ours are going on this same steamer, so there will be plenty of people to look after my mother-in-law and see that she does not get a fall. While her ankle is much improved and she walked very well yesterday, still we are all very nervous at what may happen when she has even the gentle motion of a steamer to contend with.

There are times when I do not think much of the telephone, but I have been thankful for the long-distance this morning. I never heard Elliott and Ruth knock on my stateroom door last night, and therefore I brought one of Ruth's bags all the way through with me. She decided to get off with Elliott in New York, having first decided she was coming through to Hyde Park. Without the telephone we would have found it difficult to straighten out all the changed plans, so I have to say a word of gratitude to an instrument which at times I long to fling out of the window.

E.R.
TMsd 1 July 1937, AERP, FDRL