My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Tuesday—We had a very pleasant birthday party here last night for my brother. It is so long ago since I have had the pleasure of having him with us on his birthday that I can not remember when it last occurred. However, that just made it pleasanter last evening. We observed all the usual family customs and I saw him counting his candles with care and he looked distinctly pleased at having only twenty-one. After dinner Elliott and Ruth showed us the colored movies which Elliott had taken of the fishing trip in Texas waters. The coloring was perfectly beautiful and I don't think I ever saw pictures which showed the fighting fish as well.

The picture which we saw afterwards last evening was: "This is my Affair." It was very exciting and I would like to know if it really was historically true. Many historical personages, such as President McKinley, John Hay, Mr. Root, and Theodore Roosevelt appear in it. The incident was most dramatic. I only resented one thing—namely, in the last scene it never seemed to occur to President Roosevelt that he could have opened the letter addressed to President McKinley and judged something by its contents. Of course, if it was a hoax, he would have to get Mr. Andrew's corroboration, but it might have been sufficient evidence to stay the execution for a short time at least.

This morning Anna and John went off early as they had a business engagement in Philadelphia before going to Wilmington. Elliott and Ruth left a little later to go direct to Wilmington. Now all the young people have gathered there. As usual before any event of this kind, certain people are coming to light who have not received their invitations and I suppose there are others who may have been forgotten. I always wish one could have some method which would be entirely proof against the ordinary mistakes that human beings make.

Gathered in my husband's room this morning, I found a group of very serious looking gentlemen. Amongst them was the Secretary of the Treasury so I felt sure they were discussing some important financial questions, and I was all prepared to retire when my husband beckoned me and said: "The question under discussion is, what do I do tomorrow afternoon. I don't think I had better stand in the line." I wasn't very helpful, but out of the experience of our own past, I murmured: "It doesn't really matter what you do, as long as you don't steal the show."

Only one appointment this morning and then we worked until lunch time and had lunch on the porch looking out at the monument. In a few minutes I am off to Fairfax where I have to make a speech for a group of young Democrats this afternoon.

E.R.
TMsd 29 June 1937, AERP, FDRL