My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, June 18—I was very much interested in the young girl who did the broadcast with me last night. I asked her if she had ever been on the air before and she almost gasped: "Never!" While we waited to begin our radio conversation, I told her that I would look her up next winter when I went up to Cornell in Farm and Home Week. She is taking a regular college course, not Home Economics, so my particular friends, Miss Flora Rose, therefore will not have her under her jurisdiction. I shall be interested to see if a few months away from home makes much of a change in her. I never saw a more poised and sensible looking girl, besides she radiated health which with good looks makes a very attractive combination.

I can hardly realize that I only have four more weeks left in this series of broadcasts. When I began I felt I was undertaking a tremendous task, but everyone has been so delightful to work with that I found it a very pleasant weekly experience, and shall really be sorry when the series comes to an end.

We had a bite to eat and took the evening train to Hyde Park. The sryinga bushes when we drove up to Mrs. Scheider's apartment gleamed white in the moonlight and the air all around us was perfumed by them. The police dog who as a rule has very little use for me when Miss Goodwin, Miss Dickerman and Miss Cook are around, behaved as though he was very glad to see me, and settled himself for the night in my room.

As I was all alone in one of the buildings, it was very pleasant to have his company, but I was a little annoyed when I turned over sleepily this morning and he at once took that for a sign that I was ready to get up and play with him. Before I realized what was happening both paws were on the bed and his nose was in my face.

Mrs. Scheider and I had breakfast in her living room and then started out to see what we could do to begin settling our guest house. It is an astonishing thing how many things need to be done to make even a small place liveable. After starting two or three people on various jobs, she and I went off to visit my mother-in-law at the big house, buy some food, and start acquiring such necessary things as hooks and picture wire and electric light bulbs.

Later this afternoon I am going down to visit a young friend who is in the hospital in Poughkeepsie and I shall spend the night with Mrs. Henry Morgenthau, Jr., at her farm near Fishkill, New York.

A scientist paid me a short visit this morning who has discovered an extraordinary product if all the accomplishments he claims for it are true. I only hope they are, for it would mean a great deal to humanity, not to speak of the fact that it might mean a good deal to the poor man himself and to his family.

E.R.
TMsd 17 June 1937, AERP, FDRL