My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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ILION, N.Y., Tuesday—Amelia Earhart reached Africa safely and for the first time a woman has made the eastward crossing of the South Atlantic. Congratulations to her, and may the rest of her trip be equally successful. Personally I shall be glad when this trip around the world, following more or less the equatorial line, is safely over, but that's because I am more interested in her as a person than I am in scientific adventures! I recognize, however, the value not only of scientific experiments, but the mere stimulus given the rest of us by this spirit of courageous adventure.

We drove back from Westbrook, Connecticut, last night over another road, and from Pittsfield into Albany, we faced a most glorious sunset as we would over the hills. We ate our supper by the side of the road, finishing up what we hadn't eaten for lunch, and both of us decided this morning that eating was after all a matter of habit, and we were no hungrier for breakfast than we would have been if we had had our usual three square meals yesterday.

Over the radio as we listened in the evening, came the news of Jean Harlow's death. I am not enough of a movie fan to have any particular favorities on the screen, but she lunched with me last winter, wrote me a charming note afterwards and I have kept of her a very pleasant memory. Many who have enjoyed her acting will miss her as a screen star, but I am sure there must have been around her some people to whom she was not a star, but a person. To them I should like to say that even such a casual contact as mine, has made me feel sorry that such a young person should have so little opportunity to develop her possibilities and enjoy her life.

This morning we started early on our drive to Henderson House in Herkimer County, New York, where Mrs. Scheider and I are lunching with Mrs. Theodore Douglas Robinson, on our way to Syracuse. We drove along the Cherry Valley Road which I know well and at Richfield Springs turned off and went through Jordanville, where stands the memorial library given to the village by Douglas Robinson. The Robinsons have been identified with this part of the State since the land was originally granted to the family by Queen Anne. My father's letters are full of the stories of the good times which that generation had in this old house when old Mrs. Douglas Robinson, who I can still remember well, kept house for her son, Douglas, and his sister who later married and went to live in England. The house stands on top of the mountain looking towards the foot hills of the Adirondacks. It has charm and that subtle something which only age gives a sense of atmosphere created by innumerable people who have lived here before. In this particular case they all had strong personalities, and as you look at their portraits and move through the rooms, you seem to feel their actual influence as it moulded not only their own family, but the surroundings in which they lived.

E.R.
TMsd 8 June 1937, AERP, FDRL