My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

WASHINGTON, Tuesday—It was a delightful, cool drive to and from Annapolis last night, and nothing could have been more charming than the spirit of the young committee and their chairman who was obliged to take charge of me. He behaved exactly as though he wanted to have an elderly lady as his companion for part of the evening. I kept thinking how much he must be wishing either for the young girl who was certainly somewhere in the offing waiting for my duties to be over which would automatically terminate his, or for some member of his own family.

I noticed that a number of the midshipmen have brought their mothers to the party, which seemed to me a very sweet gesture, though I think it is more suited to the young!

The decorations were charming, the setting very lovely, and the young artist who drew the decorations which had been cut out of cardboard and painted black to fill four niches in the ballroom, should be made available wherever he may be stationed for work on decorations of any kind. He certainly has talent.

This being a warm day I did most of my exercise before breakfast, starting with a ride at seven-thirty and a swim afterwards. We sat on the porch after breakfast reading and discussing some of the news, until I suddenly realized that it was time for my press conference.

After the press conference, I took a young guest who is staying with me down to see the House of Representatives in session. We did not have very much time and I wanted her to see the Rotunda of the Capitol. As we walked through the corridors and rooms to reach it, I was struck as I always am, by the strength of the statue which Gutzon Borglum did of John Greenway, who represents the State of Arizona in the Capitol. It is almost like seeing him alive, the statue has such a quality of strength and virility.

From there I went to the luncheon given by the District Federation of Women's Clubs, at which a number of the wives of Cabinet officers, the national president, Mrs. Lawson, and various other distinguished guests were present.

The news from Europe seemed very distressing last night, but today there seems to be a return to a calmer attitude which will allow everybody to explain the why and wherefore of what seemed at first inexplicable occurrances. Like so many things in life, if we have a little time to think, we are apt to be calmer. I wish twenty-four hours, a good night's sleep and a day spent in the open air could always elapse before any government officials take action on matters of grave importance.

E.R.
TMsd 1 June 1937,, AERP, FDRL