My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Monday—I entirely forgot to tell you yesterday about a very nice home party which we had on Saturday evening out in the garden. The Roosevelt Home Club from Dutchess County came down to spend the day in Washington and they evidently had a most satisfactory time visiting all the points of interest, ending up with a buffet supper with us at six-thirty.

After supper they had a movie on the second floor and then went back to their train. One little boy was in the group and I asked him if he wasn't feeling sleepy as they had come down in day coaches. He assured me he had slept at least an hour and was not in the least tired!

Mr. and Mrs. William Plog, who have for many years looked after my mother-in-law's place at Hyde Park, stayed on with us for a day or two, and I have a feeling that Mr. Plog found the greenhouses much the most interesting of the many things that they visited.

Yesterday was the first day that I felt summer had really begun and that we could relax and enjoy life, for all our big entertainments are over. We celebrated by having lunch and supper in the garden. Mr. and Mrs. Walter Brown and their two little boys were staying with us. The boys were dressed in immaculate white for luncheon. Afterwards they asked permission to feed the squirrels and we saw them from a distance wandering around the grounds with bags of nuts. An hour or so later they returned to us announcing that they had been stuck in the elevator. They looked as though they had cleaned the elevator shaft and what was once immaculate white was sadly streaked with dirt. All little boys should look like this, however, and I was glad to see that their mother took it calmly. They went off to the Smithsonian to see the dinosaurs and then came back to have a swim. When they left this morning, I thought sightseeing was over and they were going straight home, but I was told that on the contrary, they were to stop in New York to see the aquarium at the Battery, the Planetarium in the Natural History Museum on the west side of Central Park and Grant's Tomb on Riverside Drive before they took the train for Albany! Youngsters today are certainly more inquisitive than they were in my day and if they are all such keen sightseers the next generation will be well educated!

I am riding every morning now and today my official engagements are few. I greeted "Uncle Don" and his two young prize winners and this afternoon I have only to receive two ladies and go over to Annapolis for the Ring Dance tonight at which I am to receive for the cadets and their guests.

E.R.
TMsd 31 May 1937, AERP, FDRL