My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Sunday—Friday afternoon the graduating class of The Todhunter School came down for the weekend. They have been busily sightseeing yesterday and today. Both evenings we have had movies and our two sons, James and Elliott and their wives, enjoyed them as much as the young people. Friday night we had "Lost Horizons." I could not help wondering as I looked at all the young people what Shangri-La meant to them, either in the book or in the movie.

One of the newspapers down here is sponsoring a contest in which people are invited to express in twenty-five words their ideas and I would be curious to know what the majority of people give. From my own point of view, it is the attainment of what peace and contentment one can only have within oneself if one feels that whatever ideal of happiness one has created for those one truly loves, is actually attained.

"Captains Courageous" our last night's movie left most of us in tears and I was glad that my husband had decided on work rather than on an evening of entertainment, though I think the movie is really lovely and well worth seeing.

Yesterday I had my first garden party for the women executives in the various departments. It was a beautiful day and I was glad of the opportunity to be out of doors, not only during the garden party, but during a picnic lunch which I had in the garden for the senior class from Arthurdale, West Virginia, and their accompanying teachers, and our own household group.

From the picnic, I went with Mrs. Helm and Mrs. Scheider to Secretary and Mrs. Woodring's lovely place which they allowed the Women's National Democratic Club to use for their annual spring party. This house was begun by General Washington for Nellie Custis, his adopted daughter, and though it was not finished for five years, and Washington did not live to see it completed, the setting, the trees and the house itself are reminiscent of the taste which developed so much beauty at Mount Vernon. The two houses are fairly close together, and on the road between them is Washington's old grist mill, which has also been restored and I think is very interesting.

In the morning I visited the Girl Scouts' practice house and we planted a tree as part of their participation in Better Homes Week. I am glad that the Scouts make a point of learning something about landscaping and gardening, for they certainly add charm to any home.

The family all went to church this morning, and this afternoon I have one or two engagements, but Sara and Chandler are going up together to ride on Sara's pony, which sounds like a perfect Sunday afternoon for them!

E.R.
TMsd 16 May 1937, AERP, FDRL