My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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SEATTLE, Wednesday—I began to think, the other day, when everyone who came to tea remarked that I brought the sunshine with me, that Seattle must have a good deal of cloudy weather, but, if this week is any criterion, the sun always shines, and I shall take away with me the impression of sunshine on the water, of glistening white mountain peaks, and of flowers everywhere. As we drive in town every morning, the stone walls which are covered with yellow and purple and white flowers, fill me with admiration. I know no place in the East where you get the impression of every available spot being used to please the eye with some new splash of color. The city itself is spread out over so many hills that it seems to me to cover a tremendous area.

Yesterday we drove out to the University campus. A number of the buildings have been built with the aid of WPA, and I was told that it is difficult to keep building rapidly enough to accomodate the number of sutdents who desire to attend this University. It has developed several outstanding departments, so that young people are coming from all over the country.

During the afternoon, I made the rounds, with my daughter and son-in-law, of the various newspaper departments in their building. There is something quite fascinating about the variety of activities which go on under the roof of a newspaper, and it has long been my belief that from the pressroom to the editorial department, the men and women who have to do with the reporting and getting out of news are, of necessity, more interested in a variety of subjects. My daughter, little Eleanor, and I ended up our tour in the Prudence Penny Homemakers' auditorium. For little Eleanor to have tea was a real treat, and we all enjoyed our little period of leisurely conversation. I found that this department of the paper was cooperating closely with the University, and was told of a course being given there which seems to me very practical for young women. They can take it in one year. They spend three months at the University in Home Economics, go down to the University-operated tearoom in the city and spend three months in practical work, return to the University, do all the catering there for three months, and then spend three more months in an affiliated institution which turns them out at the end of the year really prepared for institutional work, not only theoretically, but practically.

I received this morning, some photographs taken in San Francisco by various newspapers, and one of them caught me in the automobile with an expression which can only mean that I thought we were about to run over some very important dignitary. The horror upon my face can only be equalled by a photograph my daughter has, taken of her just before she took a fall when skiing. Our expressions are very similar, and in both cases hardly what one would wish to have recorded for posterity.

E.R.
TMsd 5 May 1937, AERP, FDRL