My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—I had a smooth flight up Friday to New York and noticed that there were three or four women on the plane. It has occured to me so often when flying that the majority of the passengers seemed to be men travelling by air because their business required rapid transportation. Comparatively few people seemed to be flying as they would take any other means of transportation, either because the hours of departure or arrival were more convenient, or because they arrived closer to their destination, or any one of a hundred reasons for which we choose to travel either by boat or train or car.

It always has amused me to look over my fellow passengers and wonder what kind of a story I could weave about them. Sometime I have decided that a young couple were on a honeymoon and this was the girl's first flight. One day I was sure that this was the case because the girl seemed so much excited. Although they sat across the aisle, she held his hand most of the time and insisted on his looking at everything that interested her which meant getting out of his seat and leaning over her.

Women as well as men, however, should begin to look upon travelling by air just as they might upon any mode of transportation, and I was interested to see an increase in the percentage of women passengers on the plane with me on Friday. The very smart flight stewards on "Eastern Air" look a little English, either because of their uniforms or because of the smart way in which they salute you. They keep offering you things which you do not really want, but you get the feeling of a great deal of attention.

The play which the seniors at the Todhunter School gave in the afternoon and for which I was three-quarters of an hour late, was very good. At least the part I saw was very good. They gave "Iolanthe" and really did a good job.

Then Miss Cook and I took the train for Hyde Park and we could hardly wait to see what had been done in the way of work since last we were here. Of course, I have been away nearly a month, and expected to find more done that I could actually see accomplished, which is always the way when you do not see a thing grow from day to day and are impatient to get it finished!

Saturday morning I had to spend almost entirely on the way to Rhinebeck to meet the train, then up to Tivoli with Forbes Morgan, junior and Mrs. Forbes Morgan. The churchyard at Tivoli holds many memories for me, but it is a friendly spot and perhaps because of its familiarity seems to me less lonely than many more formal cemeteries.

A quiet weekend, lovely weather so we basked in the sunshine!

E.R.
TMsd 25 April 1937, AERP, FDRL