My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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Washington, Tuesday—We were only seven at dinner last night and in consequence had a really good discussion, centered primarily around the situation in coal mining areas and possible electric power developments.

I returned to my desk after dinner with the firm intention of getting a great deal of work done. I succeeded in paying my bills and balancing my check books, and writing three personal letters. Then my son, James, came in and though he said he was sleepy and was going home at once, somehow or other the time slipped away and it was well after eleven when he left. It was a little before one when I finally got up with the realization that I was not going to finish in any case and I might just as well go to bed.

Up early this morning and very much tempted, because the skies were clear and it felt deliciously warm and sunny, to forget that there was work to do and go out on the bridle path. I restrained myself, however, and after the usual round of morning consultations, at about eleven-thirty I closed my door and set myself to do some serious work. Even though closed doors may mean that no one dares to come and talk to me, the telephone is still active and I answered questions as to evening refreshments, and various other little items of importance to the household.

Suddenly I looked at my clock and it was five minutes to one and I was due at the Senate Office Building for lunch with Mrs. Garner and the Senate Ladies at one o'clock. To say that I hurried is putting it mildly and I was only ten minutes late.

We had our usual very pleasant party and I think we are all looking forward to the picnic which the Ladies of the Cabinet and I give late in May. They demanded that I find something, however, as interesting to read to them this year as the letter from Mrs. Alma Woods Johnson of Rogers, Arkansas, which was published in the Forum last August and which I read to them before publication! I don't know that I have anything quite of the same kind, but I shall search through my files and see what I can find.

After lunch I went with a friend, for a brief visit to the new Interior Department Building. The Secretary showed us his office and many points of interest. I think the decorations and color scheme is restrained and simple, enough color but not too much. It is pleasing and restful. I particularly liked the blue leather which he has chosen for the furniture in the corridor and in his own office. As usual I was fascinated by the cafeteria and the kitchen. They tell me they try to serve only government employees, but I am going to try and slip in someday unnoticed and sample the food. Back in the White House and a number of appointments before some of our house guests arrive to spend the night.

E.R.
TMsd 6 April 1937, AERP, FDRL