My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Tuesday—The White House is crowded with guests these days and we never go in or out without finding groups of people examining the portraits in the corridor or walking through looking into the rooms. It is astounding what an amount of cleaning the house needs when so many people visit us! Inside and out after yesterday we have been having a thorough scouring! The first thing I noticed when I looked out this morning was that the men were moving around on the south lawn picking up egg shells and papers and the various debris that a crowd of any size will leave behind.

My weekend guests left this morning and it certainly is a joy to have people stay with you who seem not only able to find things that they want to do themselves, but who get joy out of everything they do, even looking out of the window! Mr. and Mrs. Adolphe from Bear Mountain, went to the Amarylis show after I had seen it and returned very enthusiastic, then Mrs. Adolphe went through the exhibit of living American artists in the Corcoran Gallery with as much interest as I had felt.

Two friends of mine, Mrs. Lathrop, a painter, and her daughter, Miss Gertrude Lathrop, a sculptor who are from Albany, came in here the other afternoon for tea with me. I had not seen Mrs. Lathrop for a long time, and was delighted to find that she was one of the exhibitors at the Corcoran. Miss Lathrop has been doing a medal for the City of New Rochelle, New York, and I was very much interested to see the design. She is particularly fond of animals and she was able to work in a lamb for a given number of sheep were included in the original payment for the land on which New Rochelle was built.

Miss Helen Reynolds of Poughkeepsie, spent some time at the Congressional Library and found apparently much material in Dutchess County, New York, which she is coming down later to investigate further. My husband is just as interested in her reports as though he himself had the time to go and search through the old books and maps.

There were a number of details to be settled this morning about the visit of their Excellencies, The Governor General of Canada and The Lady Tweedsmuir, who arrive this afternoon.

At lunch time quite a number of acquaintances visiting here with their children, came in. Everybody a little late and breathless, including myself. Next to me was an English lady whom Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Tucker of New York, cousins of my husband's, had asked us to try to see. The name Mrs. Murray meant very little to me, but after a few minutes of conversation she said something to me about her sister having had a hospital at the front during the War. In a flash I realized that her sister was Dr. Murray who after serving at the front, had had a hospital in London where a group of Americans had served under her for many months. Among them were Miss Marion Dickerman and Miss Nancy Cook. I knew all about Dr. Murray and many of Mrs. Murray's other relatives as well who had also served in that hospital. What a strange little world it is!

E.R.
TMsd 30 March 1937, AERP, FDRL