My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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OKLAHOMA CITY, Sunday—Since I wrote you last in Alva, the dedication ceremonies at Northwestern State Teachers College have been concluded. One of the most amusing incidents came at the very end of the outdoor program. After Lieutenant Governor Berry had made his speech, a song composed especially for the occasion had been sung; and I had said a few words, two small Girl Scouts presented me with some flowers, but a problem arose, they were down in front of the platform and they had to get up onto the platform. This was finally accomplished with the aid of both President Brown and myself, and somebody murmured that the Girl Scouts must have a motto: "Never say die!"

At eight-thirty Saturday morning, our kind host and hostess, Mr. and Mrs. John Doolin, called for us at the hotel to motor us to El Reno. Mrs. Walter Ferguson, a fellow columnist, was in the car and I was very happy to have an opportunity to talk with her. We have frequently appeared on the same pages of various papers, and I have always had a sense of friendliness between us, though we have only met very casually before. The roads were rather muddy and slippery so we were rather late in reaching El Reno. Because of the cold, the ceremonies were held in the high school auditorium instead of being held outside the little house which the National Youth Administration has reconditioned as a youth center. I spoke for a few minutes there, and then went over to look at the little house. It seems to me that this activity of the NYA is particularly valuable and I am very glad to know that they have a number of these youth centers throughout the state, some of them on a much larger scale than the one I saw Saturday.

The boys and girls have done all the work on this little house. In the back the boys have a shop, they have done plumbing, wiring, and carpentry work. The girls have made the curtains and will do the cooking and have a room in which typewriters and sewing machines are available. This will be both a recreation center and work center for encouraging young people to learn outside of school, new things that may be of use in their daily lives. I think any community will be interested in this and may find possibilities greater than they visualize at first for helping the young people of the community to develop a variety of new interests. We stopped at one other small town for a minute on the way to Oklahoma City. Once here, I got out at the Crippled Children's school, heard them sing a song, and spoke to them for a few minutes.

The rest of the day was fairly busy, two speeches, receiving various people and to finish up, I attended with Governor and Mrs. Marland for a short time a dance given in the Hotel Biltmore for the new commanding officer at Fort Sill.

We leave this afternoon and except for seeing a few people this morning our time has been devoted to catching up on mail sent us from Washington.

E.R.
TMsd 14 March 1937, AERP, FDRL