My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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SHREVEPORT, La.—Yesterday's column was typed in the car while we were driving from Denton to Fort Worth, Texas! This is the first time that Mrs. Scheider has actually had to put the typewriter on her knees and type as we drove along! Elliott tried to be careful but every now and then we hit a bump which was not so helpful to the typist.

I was very much interested in the College of Industrial Arts for Women at Denton. Their art department has thirty teachers and they train for a number of professions, apparently very successfully. They would have liked to show me the whole college in the afternoon and I should have enjoyed seeing it, but when I had to choose between seeing the college and having a few hours at home with my children and grandchildren, I chose to go home. We spent a very pleasant afternoon writing and reading and playing with the children.

Ruth's mother, Mrs. Googins, came to supper and we left her to read to Chandler when we set off again for Denton where I had to speak at eight-fifteen in the evening. I had promised President Hubbard that I would not be late in order that they could all listen to my husband's speech because I was just as anxious to be through and listen to him myself! This was a curious sensation because as a rule I have read the speech beforehand, but on this occasion, I had no inkling of what was going to be said and so listened to it with an entirely fresh mind. We drove home very slowly with the radio turned on, and it was certainly a curious sensation to hear my husband's voice sounding so natural and coming from the room which I could visualize so well, while I was driving along a road in Texas!

One of the girls at the college presented me with a little green enamel necklace which she had made herself, and as she was interested in jewelry I showed her a ring which I always wear because the stone was given me by an old and very dear friend, the ring itself was made by Miss Grace Hazen who was twice the winner of the National Arts prize for hand made jewelry. She was very much interested and examined the work with care and then I had to give the history of the pendant which I wore, which is made in part from some old ornaments found in some ancient ruins.

Early this morning we were up and packed and my granddaughter, Chandler, ushered us in to say goodbye to baby Elliott and after breakfast the Mayor of Shreveport, Mr. Sam Caldwell came for us and we started on our drive from Fort Worth to Shreveport. It was a longer drive than I expected but a beautiful day and very lovely country, flat at first, later rolling with an increasing number of trees. We stopped for a cup of coffee and a sandwich at noon and before long a small procession of people were coming up to shake hands, one old lady confided in me that she loved my husband and followed everything he did and read all about the family whenever she could!

E.R.
TMsd 10 March 1937, AERP, FDRL