My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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FT. WORTH, Texas, Tuesday—It took us very little time to get in to Fort Worth for the eleven o'clock morning lecture yesterday. Afterwards I met the member of the Foundation which sponsored my lecture, and Ruth and her mother, Mrs. Joseph B. Googins, and stayed for lunch with them. Elliott was waiting for us when we came out about one-fifteen and as we went through the lobby of the hotel, a young girl came up to me and said that she wanted to interview me for her school paper. I told her that unfortunately there was no time then for an interview but I would answer her questions as we were walking along. As usual the question was one of those which would require a book to adequately cover. "What do you think Mrs. Roosevelt, of college education for girls?" The only answer to that is that everybody's education has to be considered from the point of view of each individual, and each individual should attempt to obtain the kind of education which best fits their own capacity and needs. Of course, books could not only be written but have been written on this question of college training and I always gasp when these questions are propounded in a casual and light-hearted manner as I walk through the lobby of a hotel!

Back in the ranch we put on our outdoor clothes and walked down to examine closely all the animals and then when Elliott and Ruth went riding, Mrs. Scheider and I went to work on the mail which had come in.

On their return they suggested another walk and Chandler who was up from her nap came up with us. We went up and down over the fields and across a brook. It was steep, but only in going over the water did this little youngster, not yet three, require any help. She was surefooted and as independent as any grown up.

Early dinner and back to Fort Worth Will Rogers Memorial Auditorium for the evening speech. On this trip comparatively few question periods have been asked for at the end of the speeches. I am always rather sorry as I feel that so often one may leave out of an address the very point which some one in the audience particularly wants to hear discussed, and the questions give an opportunity to bring out the particular interests of a locality. I am always conscious of the fact that having lived much of my life in the State of New York, my detailed knowledge and many of my illustrations must be drawn from the environment which I know best, and that it may not apply as well to various parts of the country in which I am speaking so that questions seem to me particularly important, in relating the subject to the part of the country in which you may be.

Another beautiful day, the sun shining in our windows to wake us up; a little granddaughter to invite us to go into the nursery to see her baby brother before breakfast! After breakfast a drive through country where the peach blossoms are beginning to come out, to Denton State Teachers College for Women, a college of industrial arts for women.

E.R.
TMsd 9 March 1937, AERP, FDRL