My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Monday—Most of my older guests went over to dine with Mrs. Henry Morgenthau, Jr., last night and then she brought all of her party over here for the movie at nine-thirty. This left us seventeen for dinner here, mostly young except for John's two Godfathers, Mr. Langdon Marvin and Mr. T. Jefferson Newbold; my mother-in-law, Mrs. Harvey Cushing and Mrs. Eugene duPont. We had a very jolly dinner with speeches and presents and a large birthday cake and much laughter over one young man who found a thimble and a heart in his piece of cake!

Tonight Franklin, Jr., and John go back to Boston. Franklin, Jr.'s medical tests are all behind him and on the whole they are very satisfactory but the doctors have decided that his heart is not quite up to competitive rowing which is, of course, for him a sad blow. However, graduating from college is the most important thing so he can now concentrate all his efforts on that.

My mother-in-law also is going back to New York on a late afternoon train. I had promised to go over to Annapolis for lunch and a speech to The Naval Academy Women's Club so left before noon, but my daughter-in-law, Betsey, took charge. When she discovered that my mother-in-law thought she was getting a cold, she wasted no time in having the doctor come to make sure she was not starting off with a temperature. When I returned my mother-in-law said she had told Betsey she was quite frightened by her efficiency! I thought Betsey was extremely clever to do it and say nothing about it until the doctor was in the room for otherwise I feel quite sure there would have been long protests!

The drive to Annapolis was quite lovely, it was a windy day but the air was delicious. Lunch with Mrs. Sellers was delightful, the room flooded with sunshine and we stepped out on the porch afterwards to look at the garden which in a short time will be showing signs of life. Back in plenty of time for tea with the whole family.

I am feeling extremely nervous about the Women's National Press Club dinner tonight. Having to go unprepared and hoping for an inspiration on the spot is a nerve racking business. Luckily I close the evening so I ought to be able to find something to talk about!

Miss Nancy Cook, who came down for the party tonight, and I take the midnight for New York as I have some engagements there tomorrow and I will be back here Wednesday. I am beginning to get the feeling I always have before leaving home for any length of time, namely, the urge to leave everything in complete order and do all the things which I have neglected doing, this results in a rush and an attempt to get through work which can not be done unless one sits up until all hours of the night so I expect that I shall want to sleep for at least twelve hours when I get on the train.

E.R.
TMsd 1 March 1937, AERP, FDRL