My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Sunday—I had my first letter yesterday from my small grandchildren in Seattle. Eleanor tells me that she loves it, particularly being in the country and having a room from which she can see the ships come in and out of the harbor. Their home is evidently quite out of town and for both Eleanor and Curtis this would mean the perfection of living. They have very little use for city streets and the restrictions of city life. Curtis being several years younger, confines his letter writing to sending his love, but somehow it is very warming to get these messages when children are far away.

Talking of children, I was glad to hear yesterday that New Mexico had ratified the Child Labor Amendment. It is still hanging fire in New York State, and I cannot quite understand it for New York State has always prided itself on being ahead of other states in its social viewpoint. Yet they seem to question passing the amendment which after all only allows Congress to make laws governing the labor of children. Labor has already been carefully construed so that there can no longer be any honest doubt in people's minds whether it will be possible for Congress to interfere in the actual running of the home life of children. It seems to me that once you acknowledge the fact that Congress is after all made up of citizens elected to represent all of us, you must have some faith in their framing common sense laws.

We have quite a house full over the weekend. Two youngsters, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Lynch's little girl, and Mr. and Mrs. Earl Looker's younger daughter who is my husband's godchild, are bringing back the voices of the children to a house which has had for a few days no such pleasant sound. They went out Saturday morning to ride Sara's pony and in the afternoon visited Mt. Vernon. Their elders have gone their different ways, sightseeing or visiting friends. Mrs. Isabella Greenway has come to stay for a couple of days and that is for me a rare treat.

Saturday afternoon Dr. and Mrs. Leonard Coelbrook, who are here from England came in to tea. He has made many valuable contributions to the medical world and my husband I were glad of the opportunity to see him.

Yesterday the President had one of his busiest days. When he stays in the White House and sees people in his study it gives the rest of us a chance to see what kind of a day he is having. The corridor outside his study has been filled with gentlemen all day long. I often wonder how it is possible to adjust to so many different people and their interests in the course of a day, but after all that is one of the things every President must learn to do.

Church this morning for us all and the weather is good so I hope for a ride this afternoon.

E.R.
TMsd 14 February 1937, AERP, FDRL