My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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Last night the dinner to the Justices of the Supreme Court was held. Chief Justice Hughes sat, as usual, on my right, and Mr. Justice Van Devanter on my left. Luckily for me the State Department seats all the officials but as there were quite a number of outside guests last night, I did have to give a little thought to some of the seating. Otherwise after I have passed on the menu, there is little for me to do about state functions.

The gold table decorations and service, bought by James Madison for the White House, are nearly always used and Mr. Reeves and his staff arrange the flowers. Every now and then they do something which is particularly lovely, and when I came in the front door yesterday afternoon late, my eyes were caught by the arrangement in the Blue Room of white flowers with green ferns and palms I only hope that all the guests enjoyed the flowers as much as I did.

Miss Susanne Fisher sang for us and Miss Ruth Breton played the violin, giving us a very delightful concert.

Last evening little Bill and I were telephoning to his mother who is in a hospital in Philadelphia while he has been here with us. There is really nothing serious the matter, but she naturally feels rather depressed at having to be there at all, so every evening we call her on the telephone and he tells her what he has done all day. He burst into a stream of conversation which I couldn't understand and when I took the telephone back, she said she couldn't understand it either, so his nurse had to explain what he was trying to tell her. For some reason, he had ridden his pony for a very short time in the morning and so his nurse had asked him if there was anything else he would like to do. He responded that he wanted to go to the Capitol and ride on the same little train that Scamper rode on. He evidently knows these two books by my daughter very well, and I only hope other children get as much pleasure out of them as he does. In any case, they went to the Capitol and rode on the little train which goes from the Senate Office Building to the Capitol. There was still a little time to spare and the nurse asked him what he would like to do next. He replied he would like to go to the top of the Capitol steps and bump down each step to the bottom just as Scamper had done. His nurse wisely let him do it and he returned full of his adventure!

A grand ride this morning, and then luncheon at the National Training School for Girls in the building which WPA work has transformed. I would never have recognized it and the interesting thing is that surroundings seem to have had an effect upon the human beings. The girls looked differently too and there is real teaching going on now which is something to be truly thankful for. There is more still to do but the Board of Welfare of the District, Dr. Smith and every member of the staff must be very proud of what has been accomplished.

E.R.
TMsd 3 February 1937, AERP, FDRL