My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Sunday—The sky looks today as though it had cleared for good and all, but I really do not feel I have any cause for complaint for in the last week, in spite of uncertain weather, I got in three good rides. When we come in from riding, the groom always has two lumps of sugar ready for my horse, "Dot," and first of all she shakes hands with me, giving me each front leg, and then she follows me looking for the second lump of sugar in my hand. Now we have a new trick before- [originally: ] she actually gets it, she has to put her nose up to my face and give me a kiss.

As we went through this ceremony the other morning, a young woman got out of her car with a most beautiful Great Dane dog, and she watched us with amusement. I was very much interested in her dog for my son Elliott and his wife breed Great Danes on their ranch in Texas. They are such big creatures, but so dignified and so gentle. The oldest one of their dogs lets the babies roll over him and tease him to their hearts' content. I have watched him when he could bear it no longer, get up with solemnity and walk off into a far corner but he never growls or shows any kind of ill temper. It has made little Ruth Chandler entirely fearless with dogs, which is a good thing though I am not sure that all dogs can be trusted to quite the same extent.

It poured all day yesterday and I stayed in doors until the afternoon when I had promised to visit International House at four o'clock. I was much interested in seeing this house which was given by a very generous woman last year and which seems to be doing a marvelous piece of work for the foreign students in Washington. Young people from foreign lands, attending one of the universities or over here studying some phases of life in the United States can find a welcome and make friends in this hospitable house.

From there Miss Cook and I went over to a meeting at the Friends Church held by the American Legion Auxiliary for their Fidac Essay contest. After meeting those present, they pinned the society's pin on me, and during tea Mrs. Libby sang two of Milne's songs.

After dinner last night, Mr. and Mrs. Wilfrid L. Husband showed some of their very interesting colored films of Sweden. The first ones were devoted to giving one an idea of the country side and the people with their very colorful and interesting costumes. Then they showed us various cooperative housing, and some of the workmen themselves. Of course, Sweden is a small country but a homogeneous population but that does not prevent one from looking with envy at the living conditions which they have achieved for their workers, whose incomes compare with our low income group. One thing also stands out, the love of color and of flowers. In every apartment or house there were flowers on the balconies and the grounds about the houses had growing flowers and shrubs everywhere. I am glad I saw these pictures, for it gave me a feeling of having seen something already established to encourage us who are just feeling our way in an effort to achieve a better standard of living.

E.R.
TMsd 1 February 1937, AERP, FDRL