My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Tuesday—I had a most interesting letter the other day from the wife of an inventor, making the suggestion that we had overlooked one very fertile field in which many valuable lessons might be taught. She stated that many of the games played by children or adults foster the general idea of destruction and defeat of your adversary. She suggested that the games might be made constructive. They might teach social values, the power of cooperation, of conservation, in fact your imagination can run riot when you begin to think of games as a constructive force. This lady's husband has invented a game called "Mine a Million" which is not a bad illustration of the general idea. At the same time it affords one a great deal of entertainment.

Two teas yesterday afternoon, and then I ran over to a small tea which our old friend, Bishop Atwood, was giving for his daughter, Mrs. Stephen Ives, who lives in Atlanta, Georgia, but who occassionally comes up to visit her father. This was a congenial gathering but I could only stay for a short time as the usual amount of mail was on my desk waiting to be read and marked. Having no guests for dinner last night, Mrs. Scheider and I worked all evening.

The Right Honorable Walter Runciman and Mrs. Runciman returned to the British Embassy yesterday, but Mrs. Runciman attended my press conference this morning at which Miss Jane Hoey of the Social Security Board explained the care of the needy aged, the blind and the dependent children.

Dr. Homer Rainey and Miss Gertrude Knott came to see me after the press conference to talk over this year's national folk festival. The states are now developing these festivals and many are being held every year. Once a year a national festival is held. Last year it was held in Dallas, Texas, at the Centennial. I think it of very great importance and interest, not only from an educational point of view but from an economic standpoint as there are many people who through folk arts may supplement their income.

Miss Emily Bates who went abroad on the President's Cooperative Committee to study cooperatives in Norway, Denmark and Sweden came in today and gave me some of her impressions. The trip has been of great value to her and can be helpful to our cooperatives throughout this country. Her interest is largely in what the cooperative movement can do for women and while she realizes that there must be emphasis placed on the economic and business phases of cooperatives, she agrees with me that much can be done through cooperatives on educational and recreational undertakings which will make a great difference in the lives of the people concerned.

This afternoon a committee from The State Teachers College in Harrisonburg, Virginia is being received at four-thirty and tonight we give the biggest dinner of the year for the Diplomatic Corps.

E.R.
TMsd 26 January 1937, AERP, FDRL