My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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REEDSVILLE, W.Va., Monday—We actually did have that quiet afternoon I spoke about yesterday until the three gentlemen arrived at five o'clock with diagrams of the seating at the Capitol for next Wednesday. That created some real excitement for a time, for it seemed to be a problem where everyone would find a seat.

When the gentlemen left I returned to my sitting room to find a violent game of dominoes being played by two older members of the family, cheered on by Eleanor and Curtis who jeeringly said, "Dominoes is an easy game," and their elders responded that it required great skill and that if they kept still and watched they would soon discover what real players could do!

Mrs. Scheider and I took the twelve-fifteen train last night for Reedsville, West Virginia, getting off at seven thirty this morning and going up to the little tea room at Arthurdale for breakfast. Big glasses of orange juice, coffee, ham and eggs soon satisfied even the gentlemen. West Virginia ham seems to me to be particularly good, and I think it should have some of the renown of its cousin, the Virginia ham.

After breakfast Mrs. Scheider and I went down to the newly opened little cottage hospital. Three beds and one bassinet constitutes the equipment for hospital patients. One of us remarked in a ribald manner that we would have to have a private arrangement with the stork so he would not bring twins or triplets or even single babies to shove each other out of the bassinet which would certainly not hold more than one good sized baby at a time.

The little operating room is well equipped and the doctor's office and waiting room, kitchen and store room where medical supplies are kept, looked in spic and span order and ready to care for all clinic cases. Two girls from the National Youth Administration were folding gauze and taking a course in practical nursing under the doctor and nurse.

From there I went over to the nursery school and visited every grade through the high school. There has been here as well as everywhere, an epidemic of flu and colds, and two children have had pneumonia, one has been very ill indeed, but everyone seems to be pulling through.

The lunch being served to nursery school children seemed to me very sensible—creamed eggs, buttered beets, mashed potatoes and milk. The older children were having a stew which attracted us by its savory odor as soon as we came into the building, with bread and butter and milk in addition.

These lunches seem to me a very important part of the school life for the mothers cook and serve them as volunteers and it means a great deal to the health of the children.

We have had a school committee meeting, and a medical committee meeting and in a short time will attend the Arthurdale homesteaders meeting and get off in the late afternoon for Washington.

Eleanor Roosevelt. [originally: .]
TMsd 18 January 1937, AERP, FDRL