My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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Yesterday afternoon Mr. and Mrs. Yorke Allen came to spend the night, and after a very brief time with them at five o'clock, I drove over to the club house of The American Association of University Women where a meeting was being held in the interests of the Southern Women's Educational Alliance, of which Dr. Hatcher has been the head for many years.

I am beginning to think first of the question of health where underprivileged children are concerned no matter what part of the country they come from, so I asked Dr. Hatcher if they were including physical examinations and an effort to remedy physical defects in their program for vocation and educational guidance. She says they are, for they find as I have found, that the first requisite for every child is a sound body.

We had a seven o'clock dinner for last night we held the Judicial Reception, and in spite of the flu which is raging and has laid so many people low, Chief Justice and Mrs. Charles Evans Hughes; Mr. Justice Willis Van Devanter and his sister, Mrs. Sanford L. Raridan; Mr. Justice James McReynolds; Mr. Justice Sutherland; Mr. Justice and Mrs. Butler; Mr. Justice and Mrs. Roberts; and Mr. Justice Cardozo were all there to head the line. Justice Brandeis has made it a point not to go to any social gatherings whatsoever for some years past. He has reached that heavenly situation where if you really want to see him, you go to see him in his own home, so he is quite assured of never seeing people who are in any way paying a perfunctory visit. Mr. Justice Stone is still away on account of illness but is expected back before very long.

Following the Justices come the Attorney General and Mrs. Cummings, the Solicitor General and Mrs. Reed; then judges and members of the legal fraternity with their wives and daughters up to a goodly number. Last night it turned out to be nine hundred and forty when the last one had shaken the President by the hand and he retired to the Oval Room on the second floor. James and I started through the rooms and it was about ten-fifteen when we found our way upstairs.

As I was walking up to the White House yesterday afternoon after lunching with Mrs. Garner, a man ran up behind me and offered me an inaugural program which was very kind of him because I had not seen one before. I found it very interesting, and I think the program committee has given people something they will like to read in case they are kept waiting at any point during the day of January 20th.

Today is another rather mild and gray day and amongst the large group of ladies who gathered for luncheon with me today, there was a good deal of comment on our very warm weather. If only it doesn't decide to change its mind on January 20th, I shall be content, but I have a feeling that on that day we may begin to have the worst blizzard of the winter.

E.R.
TMsd 13 January 1937, AERP, FDRL