My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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The Cabinet dinner went off very well. It is more of a family party than any of the other state functions, though of course, there are a good many people from out of town as well as from Washington.

After dinner we had a young pianist, Mr. Beveridge Webster, who gave us a perfectly delightful evening. He played many things of which I am very fond, in a really masterly way and a lighter touch was given to the evening by Alice Wynne's dancing and Miss Juilet's recitations.

After I said goodnight to all my guests and found out everybody's breakfast wishes, I went in to the President's study to say goodnight. It was midnight and I thought high time for everybody to go to bed, but I was wrong. He was going to read his message over to his assistants and of course, I sat right down to listen and forgot that I had ever thought it was bed time.

Miss Esther Lape, Miss Elizabeth Read and I had an early breakfast together. They came down yesterday afternoon for the Cabinet dinner and spent the night at the White House as did Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Flynn.

At eleven-thirty I went over to the conference on negro youth which is being conducted under the auspices of the National Youth Administration. Unfortunately I could only stay a very short time for I had an appointment here with Dr. Mary Love Collins, to talk over the arrangements for the presentation of the medal given by the Chi Omega Achievement Award Committee. A hurried luncheon and then we dashed off ahead of the President to get into our seats in the Executive Gallery at the Capitol.

It is always an interesting sight to see the two Houses of Congress gathered together and I tried to pick out all the women members. Mrs. Nan Honeyman from Portland, Oregon, is a new member and I was interested to see her sitting beside Mrs. O'Day. I have known her for many years, in fact ever since we were both young girls, for her father was a great friend of my aunt, Mrs. Douglas Robinson. She has been active in politics in her own state for some time and should be of real value as a representative.

Around us in the Gallery sat Mrs. Hughes, and the usual number of Cabinet wives, plus a number of friends. All the other galleries were filled to capacity also. Everything was beautifully arranged however, and we reached our seats and got away without any trouble at all.

I am flying up to New York this afternoon late to open the class in Current Events at the Junior League Club House which The Todhunter School has every year.

E.R.
TMsd 6 January 1937, AERP, FDRL