My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Monday—Sunday was on the whole a fairly quiet day. Ruth and Elliott left with their friends for New York and Johnnie went back to college. James and Betsey were here for lunch with Ambassador Daniels and his son and daughter-in-law, Dr. and Mrs. Worth Daniels. Mrs. Daniels unfortunately is still in Raleigh on account of the death of a dear cousin. We all of us have a very soft spot for Ambassador Daniels. He is the sweetest, kindest person, with a fund of wisdom always enlightened by humor.

In the afternoon Betsey and Jimmy left for New York to make their final arrangements for moving down here as soon as possible. I went to one of the Sunday afternoon popular concerts given by the National Symphony Orchestra conducted by Mr. Hans Kindler. It was a delightful two hours and I returned in a most calm and peaceful frame of mind. Mozart never stirs me very deeply but he certainly gives me a delightfully calm and on the whole cheerful time.

Mr. Alexander Woolcott and a few other friends came to Sunday night supper and I was much amused when Mr. Woolcoot urged Mr. Ernest Lindley to join the anti-aviation club for among our guests were Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Smith. Mr. Smith has a very vital interest in American Airlines but he never changed his expression until I suggested that perhaps he would take the different point of view! My husband had to go off and work on his message to Congress very soon after supper but the rest of us talked until about ten-thirty

Anna's two red setter dogs, Jack and Jill, when they cannot have Anna who stands first in their affections turn to Johnnie if he is at home and devote themselves entirely to him. The minute his bags were packed yesterday they seemed to realize the fact that he was leaving for good. Their dejection was visible, when he was gone however, they left his room at once and returned to mine. They never question but what I will be there ready to receive them and we settle down peacefully into our usual routine. Johnnie lets them sleep on his bed and I don't, and this they accept philosophically. They come in and look at my bed rather longingly but then they go back and curl up on their customary sofa.

I ate my breakfast alone this morning till Sara and Chandler came in to greet me and I suggested we go and see if grandpa was awake. Chandler ran gaily ahead, dashed up to him and when he said he had a slight cold and she must kiss the back of his head, she carefully imprinted a kiss on the back of his neck without any question as to the necessity or wisdom of this procedure! Then taking Sara by the hand she led the way into her mother's room where all of her Christmas toys are spread out ready to play with and I left them there happily occupied.

I spent the morning on the mail and attended a delightful luncheon given by Mrs. Swanson, the wife of the Secretary of the Navy.

E.R.
TMsd 4 January 1937, AERP, FDRL