My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON—When I finished my column yesterday, I did not realize that the most exciting part of my day was still before me! After a very pleasant little period of singing by the Girls High School Glee Club and tea, six of us started off to drive to Terra Alta, where I was to take the train. It is a mountain road and full of curves. It was slippery and absolutely dense fog so that the higher we climbed, the less we could see ahead of us. Finally our driver had his head out of the window saying he was watching the white line down the middle of the road which he could still see. I was sitting on the right hand side of the car so I kept my eyes on the side of the road. The boy driving the car behind us was very familiar with the road and finally he passed us and his tail light acted as a pilot for us. We reached our destination safely, but the two men who had planned to drive on through to Washington, gave up the drive, put the cars in a garage and came on with us by train.

We got in late last night but Jack, the red setter seemed to be wide enough awake to thump his tail with joy at not being the only occupant of my room. I was so sleepy I could hardly pat him and say an adequate good night!

A few good hours of sleep, however, and I woke full of pep this morning. I meant to go out to do some Christmas shopping but by the time I had gone over Mrs. Helm's basket, signed and marked the mail which was on my desk, done such things as Mr. Muir and Mrs. Nesbitt wanted and written a few long hand notes, it was twelve-thirty and Mrs. Morgenthau had come to see me. We had a nice little talk before lunch. Mrs. Ernest Lindley and Mrs. Bernard Ryan of Albion, New York joined us for lunch. Miss LeHand also appeared, having just stepped off the train from Florida, and brought me a note from my daughter-in-law, Betsey, who had gone through to New York.

I was much interested this morning to find in my mail an account of the work done by the American Christian Committee for non-Jewish German refugees. During the past months, churches in this country have been raising a fund to take care of refugees who have come to this country and who are to be found in various European and South American countries in still larger numbers. The Jewish people have done a wonderful piece of work in caring for their own refugees and have generously contributed many thousands of dollars for the care of the non-Jewish refugees but there still seems to be a need for further assistance.

E.R.
TMsd 3 December 1936, AERP, FDRL