My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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YORK, Pa.—Mr. George William Patterson of Castine, Maine who has sent the President a poem before, has just sent in another one, two lines of which I want to quote:

"Who spares not self, with valor runs his race, so greatly doth he yearn
To serve the people whom true hearts embrace, his country's love shall earn

It does not always seem as though this were true, and yet all public servants might well keep these lines before them, for fickle as is sometimes public approved, in the long run I think they are true of those who give unstintingly of themselves and keep their courage.

Yesterday afternoon we cast political interests aside and turned entirely to the younger generation. James and Betsey's little girl was christened in the house at four p.m. and her sister, Sara, looked on with great interest. Both children woke up Election night when the Hyde Park club came down to seranade the President and instead of being either frightened or cross, they looked out of the window with the keenest enjoyment. When I spoke of this to their nurse this morning and marvelled at their senenity, she remarked that the tears came later before they went back to sleep! Little Kate, named after her grandmother, Mrs. Harvey Cushing, will find it easy to remember her christening day in the future!

James had some difficulty in arriving but he did get here on time with her godfather and one godmother. The other godmother came from New York. Our son, James, felt that because of the campaign in Massachusetts he must stay there last night and be with those who had worked with him, but he was in touch with his father by telephone all through the evening.

This morning early I started for Washington by motor, taking a picnic lunch to eat on the way, and I expect to arrive at the White House by eight o'clock this evening and be more or less settled and ready to meet my husband, his mother and sister-in-law, Mrs. J. R. Roosevelt when they arrive by train tomorrow, Friday, morning.

The next few days will be busy ones.

For some time I have wanted to say a word about a book which I think is going to be very useful in schools and colleges as an addition to the various studies which have been made of professions and occupations which girls and women may follow. This book written in the form of a novel, tells the story of a girl who became a newspaper reporter. It is called: "Peggy Covers the News", by Miss Emma Bugbee of the Herald-Tribune staff. It seems to me a very good piece of work for it shows both the difficulties and satisfactions which come from this particular vocation.

E.R.
TMsd 5 November 1936, AERP, FDRL