My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y.—I left Hyde Park yesterday after lunch, drove down to New York, dressed, had a bite to eat and then went over to the Hotel Pennsylvania for the League of Mothers' dinner which I had promised to attend some weeks ago. This organization is to me a particularly interesting one. It consists of groups from various settlement houses throughout the City of New York. Most of them are mothers living in tenements, many of them work outside in addition to doing their home duties. In their organization they carry on an educational program. They study sanitation, housing the care of children, in fact any subjects that tough their daily lives.

I shook hands with a good many of them before we sat down at the table at seven-thirty and then because I wished to be back at Hyde Park when my husband spoke at eleven p.m., they allowed me to speak and delayed their dinner until I was through—a courtesy which I deeply appreciated. The new president, Mrs. Harris, sat on my right and we talked for a few minutes before Dr. John Elliott who was Master of Ceremonies for the evening, got up to present me.

When I was through Mrs. Harris on behalf of the League thanked me with a poise and ease which many women of long experience in club work might have envied and presented me with a gorgeous bunch of chrysanthemums. It was a group that left you with a warm feeling around your heart. I am glad to have been there and hope that they will come an ever more important factor in the life of New York City.

I got home at a quarter before eleven to find my daughter and son-in-law and youngest son had already arrived. We all sat around listening to my husband and then talking over the end of the campaign. It is a grand sensation to have it over with, to know that you need no longer listen to rumors and prognostications, that life can go back into its usual channels and people will be just people again without a party tag attached to them.

Everyone else slept fairly late this morning, but I had to be up early for this little message has to go off to you at an early hour today because of election news and then we must all be ready to go up and vote at eleven o'clock. After that the President plans to survey some roads in the woods with the boys who are home for the day and peace and quiet will reign until the later afternoon.

E.R.
TMsd 3 November 1936, AERP, FDRL