My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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My daughter and son-in-law and I had a long quiet evening together in my little apartment last night but just to give us a touch of excitement my husband called me from Washington about eight p.m. to announce that our itinerary was changed and instead of leaving on Friday, we would leave on Thursday at noon!

It made me feel a little hurried because so many things had been arranged down here for Thursday. I was receiving some one from the District Social Welfare Commission who wanted to tell me about certain very undesirable conditions. The State Department had arranged two calls for the wives of foreign representatives and in a few minutes all must be changed but we have learned to [unclear term marked] adjust to sudden changes and we do!

Hurriedly this morning we telephoned, making as many of the Thursday appointments on Wednesday afternoon as possible. Mrs. Greenway, here from Arizona for a few days, came to lunch. Mrs. Scheider and I worked all the way down on the train and this afternoon all three of my Thursday appointments took place.

I was particularly interested in Madame Wissa from Egypt. She has just come from the Peace Meeting at Brussels which was called by Lord Robert Cecil. She wishes to talk to the women of this country about Egypt, its women, their efforts to change social conditions in their own country, and their interest in peace of the world. I only hope that she gets a chance to talk in many places throughout our nation. Her English is excellent and I think women everywhere will feel a sense of kinship in her interests and ideals. It is so important that we begin to realize that other women, like ourselves, live throughout the world.

The wife of the Latvian Minister was my other guest. She is studying English very hard but as yet our conversation had to be in French.

I think our political excitements must seem very strange to these representatives of foreign countries. She told me she wanted very much to be in New York City on election night. I urged her to go, to visit both party headquarters and to see Broadway which to me is a sight one should not miss on election night if one has never seen it.

Now I am trying to pack, to arrange a hundred and one small details and to leave with a feeling of calm at noon tomorrow. I will be able to tell you in tomorrow's column whether this has been achieved!

E.R.
TMsd 7 October 1936, AERP, FDRL