My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—This has been a full day! I left at nine-fifteen a.m. to pick up Mrs. Morgenthau and together we went to Mr. Jesse Straus' funeral. Funerals are sad for those who are left behind to live on without some one they love. In the case of Mr. Straus whose life was so useful, so full of interest and achievement, however, one can not help being glad that Tennyson's "Crossing The Bar" was read at his funeral. Emphasis was laid on the words: "And may there be no sadness of farewell when I embark." A fitting salute and one of whom it may be said: "Well done thou good and faithful servant."

Later I paid a call on the National Progressive League for Roosevelt at their headquarters in the Hotel Roosevelt and lunched with the League of Progressive Republican Women who have come together to retain the present administration in office because they feel it has done a service to the nation.

From there I went down to the Armory on 34th Street where Colonel Somervell met me to show me the WPA Exhibition. What interesting work is being done in the public schools for health in this great city, for recreation and in many other ways! As I walked around I kept thinking of the Mayor's remark when he opened the exhibition last night. He said every good thing you see here represents one more individual who has retained his independence and supported himself and his family. That is the first consideration. Then we come to what has been accomplished by this work and here we find the benefits spreading out to hundreds of thousands of people. Think of the children kept from possibly wrongdoing by the programs in the play streets and camps; of the men, women and children helped by the tuberculosis project which is perhaps bringing to light many case of this disease which otherwise might have gone undetected and infected whole families and the clinics for social diseases which are probably only scratching the surface, but are beginning a much needed work.

I went on to the WPA Art Exhibit at 11 West 53rd Street and was very much impressed by the work and interested in a group of children who had work on exhibition today, some of which was to remain in the Museum.

In the Whitney Museum, which I visited next, the Treasury Department is showing murals and sculpture and pictures. They have really done a remarkable piece of work and if you have not seen this exhibitition, I think it will interest you, to get an idea of the art which for the first time will decorate public buildings in different parts of the country and of the pictures which are now available for our embassies in Europe and some public buildings here.

E.R.
TMsd 6 October 1936, AERP, FDRL