My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

ALBANY, N.Y.—I reached Syracuse yesterday afternoon late and went directly to my husband's car where innumerable Democratic leaders from different parts of the State were coming in to shake him by the hand. It was nice to see old friends and before long our cousin, Mrs. Harry Roosevelt, came in to see us and then an old friend whom we always see whenever we are in Syracuse, Leo Casey. Suddenly I discovered that seven gentlemen including the Governor were dining on the train with my husband, and it was apparent that ladies would be in the way! Fortunately I had been asked to dine at the Hotel Ondongawith some of the women leaders so I now hastily accepted and we had a very pleasant time, Mrs. Lehman, Mrs. O'Day, Miss Earheart and I at one end of the table with Mrs. Good and Mrs. Leach, Mrs. Backer, Mrs. Poletti and various others extending down either side.

By eight thirty I was back at the train and drove to the Convention Hall with my husband, Governor Lehman, and Chairman Farley. Again the pleasant experience of recognizing familiar faces in the crowded hall seeing banners with the familiar county names. Off a little to the left our own county of Dutchess had a very active banner waving in the air. The hall was packed and everyone seemed most enthusiastic. The usual pictures were preliminary to the real opening of the session and the klieg lights that always made a speaker hot no matter what the temperature may be outside were turned on and off. I was rather glad that I had had no opportunity to read this speech beforehand. To me it seemed temperate, courageous and fair, but perhaps my judgment may be considered prejudiced! At the end of the session my husband left at once for Washington and I went back to the hotel to talk until midnight with Miss Perkins and Mrs. O'Day and various others and then took a train for Albany.

I found myself this morning arriving at the DeWitt Clinton Hotel just as the last of the Republican Convention was leaving and several Landon buttons were conspicuous in the dining room. At ten o'clock I attended the opening of the first National Youth Administration Conference in New York State. Four young people spoke and Mr. Hesley, the upstate director of the National Youth Administration, reported on the achievements of the first year. The members of the conference are largely directors and supervisors and young people from different parts of the State. The purpose is to clarify the results of the work done and plan for the future. I am finding it a most interesting experience.

E.R.
TMsd 30 September 1936, AERP, FDRL